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Fees and Funding

Here's the fees and funding information for each year of this course

Overview

A master’s degree in law is a fantastic way for law graduates to develop a specialisation, or for non-lawyers working in related fields to gain a deeper understanding of legal issues.

This LLM pathway combines specialist study of international law, with valuable practical training in advocacy, legal practice and litigation skills. You’ll be taught fundamental topics in international law at the cutting-edge of current research, while simultaneously developing the necessary legal skills to apply your knowledge in a clinical context. You’ll also have the chance to diversify your training through extensive module options.

Alongside the optional modules, you may choose to either write a 15,000 word dissertation or conduct a work-based project that will give you valuable experience of dealing with a specific legal issue in detail.

The course is perfect for lawyers and law graduates looking for career development, although all of our LLM courses can be studied by students without a background in law, since you will be trained in the necessary analytical and legal skills.

The programme also offers an optional placement year, following your first year. Placements will be provided and supported either by us or a partner organisation where you'll gain worthwhile and practical real-world experience in handling issues relating to aspects of social welfare law. This is a unique and exceptional opportunity for you to work in law. International students wanting to do the Placement year must indicate so upon application. 

As such, the programme will also provide ideal training for paralegals, journalists, NGO and charity workers, policy advisors, consultants, lawyers, those working in business and finance or anyone who will benefit from a legal education in their career.

What makes this course different

Student working on a laptop

Optional placement year available.

We will find the placement employer through our partnerships and industry connections for you and you’ll gain valuable and practical work experience.

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A unique course

The course uniquely combines practical training in both domestic and international legal practice, with academic study of contemporary international law.

Man organising post-it notes

99% internationally recognised research

Learn from area specialists, in a law department with 99% of its research rated as ‘international quality’ (REF 2014)

Lecturer teaching a class in the lecture theatre

Evening classes

Your 6 contact hours a week are evening classes (6 – 9pm), providing flexibility to fit in with your lifestyle

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

We consistently review our courses to ensure we are up-to-date with industry changes and requirements from our graduates. As a result, our modules are subject to change.

You’ll study two core taught modules before choosing a further two optional topics from our extensive list of LLM modules. The core modules combine practical training in legal practice, with a strong foundation in contemporary international law so you’ll develop a well-rounded understanding of the theory and its application.

Our course is also unique in its combination of both domestic and international law, giving you a deeper understanding of both aspects of the law by learning about their relationship to each other.

As well as choosing your optional modules, you can decide to either write a postgraduate dissertation or carry out a work-based project. Both of these options allow you to carry out independent study on a topic of your choice, developing your practical legal skills while honing your knowledge of a specific legal issue. This project, paired with the advocacy training in your core modules, ensures you graduate with an in-depth knowledge of international law backed by strong practical competence in legal practice.

UEL has a reputation for excellent research in international law, so you’ll be taught by leading experts in the field.

The programme also offers an optional placement year, following your first year. Placements will be provided and supported by the London-based NGO, Pro Bono Communities, where you'll gain valuable experience in handling issues relating to aspects of social welfare law. Training and supervision will be provided by Pro Bono Communities and a module leader at UEL will oversee the relationship and assess student performance.

DOWNLOAD COURSE SPECIFICATIONS

MODULES

  • Core Modules
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    International Law: Problems and Process (Mental Wealth)

    The main aim of the course is to stimulate your research interest in topical areas of international law and to develop your research skills in both public and private international law. The course, intended as a core LLM module, presents a survey of key debates in public and private international law. It thereby provides a grounding in the skills and methodologies required for postgraduate study of international law.

    Being core to all UEL LLM pathways, this module will also incorporate a series of skills workshops to help orient you on the programme. These will cover essential skills and also address issues of employability and the core competencies of mental wealth.

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    Advocacy, Interventions and Practice 

    This module will provide you an overview of the role of advocacy, various forms of interventions and legal practice in an international context. You will explore the various entry points for human rights impact and activism to achieve the objectives of protecting human rights, development and rule of law. You will receive an introduction to the art of advocacy, including court etiquette, and rules and procedures.

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    Applied Project

    The aim of the dissertation is to enable Students to initiate and carry through an academic inquiry outside the formal structure of the taught LLM Modules. Students select their own field of research and build on the knowledge and skills acquired in the taught LLM Modules.

    Optional Modules
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    Law of International Finance

    In this module you will examine the legal issues created by the international operations of large commercial banks, merchant banks and investment banks. Although based primarily on a discussion and analysis of current London City Practices, reference to other relevant laws are examined. The course has a strong comparative and international law content and emphasises a study of regulatory issues and private international law considerations in the context of international finance.

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    Financial Crime and Corporate Criminal Liability

    • You will develop knowledge and critical understanding of financial crime offences from a domestic, European and international perspective.
    • You will examine the most relevant legal issues related to fraud, bribery and corruption, money laundering, terrorism financing, tax evasion, insider trading and cybercrime.
    • You will learn about illustrate the UN, US and EU economic sanctions regimes.
    • You will engage with with issues related to proceeds and instruments of crime.
    • You will gain an understating of the financial crime compliance measures adopted by corporations to fight against economic crime offenses.
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    International Corporate Governance

    The module aims to provide you with a comprehensive appreciation of the legal, theoretical and practical underpinnings of the operation and control of contemporary corporations. It introduces students to the evolving framework that seeks to regulate the intricate relationships between, and often conflicting interests of, the corporation and its board of directors, the management, shareholders and the broader society within which they operate. Whilst the module draws from English law, it is international and comparative in focus and exposes students to the evolving global corporate governance regimes.

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    The Law of the World Trade Organisation and Globalisation

    The primary aim of this module is to introduce you to complex international trade law and globalization issues. As the approach will be interdisciplinary, at the end of the course you will have an understanding of the history and politics of the post-World War II trading regime in addition to the principles of international trade regulation. You will also interrogate factors and forces shaping globalization and the consequences of this process for the global trading order.

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    International Criminal Law

    The aim of the module is to introduce you to the current debates about international criminal law, its doctrines and institutions with special reference to this newly emerging legal order.

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    Oil and Gas Law and Policy (Mental Wealth)

    The module aims to provide you with a comparative and analytical exploration of contemporary upstream and downstream oil and gas and minerals regulatory trends particularly in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East in some key areas like Oil and Gas Law, Contracting, Decommissioning and Trade. In particular it seeks to give you a thorough grounding in the areas:

    • Oil and Gas finance and international economic law
    • Energy transactions - Law, policy and practice
    • Petroleum development and production arrangements and Rights
    • Energy and the International treaty framework
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    Economic Integration in the Developing World

    This module focuses on economic integration in developing countries. It seeks to locate the process of regionalism within the framework of economic, legal and political development in economically disadvantaged parts of the world. The methodology of the module is interdisciplinary. You will explore questions of law, politics, economics, history and sociology. Thus, students are expected to understand both legal and non-legal perspectives on economic integration in developing countries.

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    Work Based Project

    The aim of this module is to give students the opportunity to work as an intern with an organisation on a specific project relevant both to both their work and their LLM studies. You will write an extended piece of research on a project agreed with both the School and the host organisation.

  • Optional Modules
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    LLM Optional Placement

    You can opt in to participate in a placement year, where we will help place you within a business where you can gain hands on experience in law – connecting what you’ve learnt at University to industry. Students wanting to do the Placement year must indicate so upon application.

HOW YOU'LL LEARN

All our LLM courses are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops. We extensively use problem-based learning, class discussion and case studies to ensure our teaching is brought to life, while all our lectures are issued as podcasts to give you greater access to learning resources and allow you to revisit specific classes.

The LLM Transitional Justice, LLM International Law and Legal Practice and LLM Human Rights Advocacy pathways are supported by regular events at the Centre for Human rights in Conflict. These involve presentations from prominent experts in the field of human rights in conflict. This year's speakers included Michael Ignatieff, President and Rector of the Central European University and Former Leader of the Canadian Liberal Party, David Malone, Rector of the United Nations University and Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations. 

Other recent speakers at UEL have included included Lord Neuberger, President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, and the high-profile human rights lawyer (and UEL law graduate) Imran Khan.

All teaching on the programme takes place in the evening at our newly opened purpose built building at University Square Stratford, which has cutting edge facilities and includes a Mooting Room, Harvard Lecture Theatre and our newly re-launched Law Clinic provided to assist the local community. Students also have access to the new library that opened in 2013 on the Water Lane campus at Stratford.

If you go for the placement option, your degree will take an extra year as you will be placed in a workplace for 10 months. Placement is not available to part-time students. Students wanting to do the Placement year must indicate so upon application.

HOW YOU'LL BE ASSESSED

All modules are research-based, involving coursework. You will take four modules of 30 credits each for which you will submit coursework of approximately 7,000 words at the end of the term. The LLM dissertation, accounting for 60 credits, involves a 15,000-word essay. Full-time students normally complete the 180 credits requirements in one academic year while part-time students complete the same in two years.

The work placement module for the additional second year of the is 120 Placement Credits but will not bear academic credits. The module will be taken by students after completion of their dissertation module and will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. The criteria for progression to the work placement module is the successful completion of the LLM taught modules (i.e. with minimum of 50% pass mark). The University will work in close partnership with the students to help them secure the work placements.  

CAMPUS and FACILITIES

University Square Stratford

University Square Stratford, University Square Stratford

WHO TEACHES THIS COURSE

The teaching team includes qualified academics, practitioners and industry experts as guest speakers. Full details of the academics will be provided in the student handbook and module guides.

What we're researching

At the University of East London we are working on the some of the big issues that will define our future; from sustainable architecture and ethical AI, to health inequality and breaking down barriers in the creative industries.

Our students and academics are more critically engaged and socially conscious than ever before. Discover some of the positive changes our students, alumni and academics are making in the world.

Please visit our Research section to find out more.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Studying an LLM in international law will open up a variety of employment opportunities across the private sector, in international organisations like the UN, WTO or World Bank, and in government or the courts.

This pathway contains a strong amount of clinical training, as well as teaching in both domestic and international law to give you a multi-faceted education that will be highly attractive to employers in an increasingly competitive field.

The course also allows you to undertake a work-based project so you can gain practical experience and build professional links, while our renowned Law Clinic enables you to work on real legal cases with local people to enhance your clinical skills while you study.

Explore the different career options you can pursue with this degree and see the median salaries of the sector on our Career Coach portal