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Fees and Funding

Here's the fees and funding information for each year of this course

Overview

Imagination, investigation and innovation are the driving forces behind this course. Join us to explore a wide variety of approaches and discover areas that interest you. 

This is one of our flagship degrees and is recognised by the Royal Institute of British Architects and Architects Registration Board. You’ll achieve the first qualification you need on your journey to becoming an architect. 

Download our yearbook to view examples of our students' work.

We take a hands-on approach, so you can expect us to push your creativity. Throughout the course, you’ll focus on the process of making, and then reflect on what you’ve designed to boost your technical knowledge.You’ll develop the skills all architects need, including drawing, model making and using computer-aided design.

In the lecture theatre, you’ll cover history, theory, technology and computing. To give you the support you need, our experienced tutors will run sessions with you individually or in a small group. 

Throughout the course, you’ll develop your own creative style, and put together your own portfolio to showcase your talents to potential employers after you graduate. The core of architecture is the design studio, and the main emphasis of our course is developing your design ability. Since our key aim is to push your creativity and judgment to the maximum, you can expect the course to be highly demanding.

The four-year course is perfect if you want a degree in Architecture, but don’t have the standard qualifications. We prepare you for your degree during your Foundation year, bringing you up to speed with academic skills and a firm grounding in advertising. Then you can go on to do the full undergraduate degree.

What makes this course different

Silver cup

Ranked second

Our Architecture courses are ranked second in London (Guardian University Guide league table 2018).

Hands writing on paper

Accreditation

Our course has the unconditional recognition of the Royal Institute of British Architects and Architects Registration Board, giving exemption from RIBA/ARB Part 1. You’ll be on your way to becoming a fully qualified architect.

Aerial view of an exhibition

Award-winning

We’re an award-winning, internationally recognised department. Two of our lecturers are part of a team that won Britain's most prestigious visual arts award - the 2015 Turner Prize. Our students have also won a string of awards in the last two years.

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

Architecture students come to us from varied educational backgrounds, so the first year of the course is partly about assessing your abilities and giving you the tools to learn. The year is organised to help you develop the practical skills an architect needs, such as drawing, model-making and computer-aided design.

Over the three years of the course, you'll develop your creativity and critical judgement and create a high-quality portfolio that shows your practical, academic and professional skills.

You'll also gain knowledge of the history and theory of architecture, art and design, the technology of building, the building industry, environmental and sustainability issues and the regulatory framework in which architecture is produced.

You'll learn to use creativity, conceptual skills and judgement to identify human needs and requirements, and to meet or express them spatially. 

You'll also gain experience in physical making and workshop skills, using a range of media (drawing, models, computers, photography, film-making) to develop your ideas and create architectural proposals.

We consistently review our courses to ensure we are up-to-date with industry changes and requirements from our graduates. As a result, our modules are subject to change.

MODULES

  • Core Modules
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    Techniques for Designing

    This module introduces students to a set of tools for designing (materials, methods, attitudes and techniques) involved in design generally in both 2&3D. It aims to develop the student’s confidence and ability to use a range of methods and media in exploring, developing and presenting their ideas clearly and effectively, as well as an ability to evaluate and rework their output in response to feedback in terms of its technical, craft and aesthetic qualities. Briefs are introduced so that design ideas are explored both individually and in groups. These aim to introduce a suitable work ethic and the practise of design as an iterative process, and to support experiment and trial and error, through short design orientated projects and exercises that build confidence and competence.

    This module works in partnership with the Design Project module (AR3002) in that it prepares students for exploring & practising the potential of selected media, materials, methods and techniques used in the development of their own design work in Design Project module (AR3002).

    The module introduces safe and appropriate workshop practice.

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    Design Project

    The module aims to provide students with a broad, varied, stimulating range of projects that introduce them to the skills, processes and practices involved in making design projects. The module intends to facilitate students to develop a critical, disciplined and productive approach to the act of designing and to support independent thinking, making and communicating.

    This open ended interpretive and longer individual projects allow for fostering a personal perspective and sense of direction, reinforcing independence and commitment to generating and developing more self-motivated, innovative, enquiry based project work within a principal area of specialisation.

    Through completing design projects set in this module, students will develop and evolve their portfolio of work in a distinctive way that is evidence of increasing subject specificity and an ability to make an informed choice of progression pathway.

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    A&D Design Workshop

    This module introduces students to a broad range of Art and Design practical disciplines through a series of short workshop activities. It aims to develop the student’s confidence and ability to use a range of methods and materials by synthesizing methods and practice across art and design.

    This module supports Design Project module (AR3002) in that it prepares students for exploring selected media, materials, methods and techniques used in the development of their own design work.

    The module introduces safe and appropriate workshop practice.

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    Design Media

    This module introduces a variety of contemporary media techniques that are relevant to design and artistic practice in its widest sense.

    It aims to support the evolution of the creative habits of recording, collecting, documenting, reading, reworking and evaluating. It seeks to build broad understanding of the relationship between context and creative practice, first in analogue, then in digital formats. The complexity of the media employed and exercises set will increase as the module develops and depending on the ambition and skills of each student.

    The projects will be organised in both individual and groups, and that support students in learning to articulate & share ideas, work effectively in teams and at pace, and to be able and organise and deliver projects.

     

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    History and Theory

    The module introduces you to a basic understanding of History & Theory Studies in the subject of architecture and design, through engaging with selected histories and theories relevant to art, culture, technology and contemporary practice.

    The module prepares students for helping them to structure and plan their research work and their communication outputs, for further critical and theoretical work in higher education. 

    As a result, students will begin to acquire a range of basic skills in observation, research & reviewing methods, critical thinking, writing and communication.

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    Mental Wealth Professional Life

    Developing the key intellectual and practical skills, and the psychological and physical determinants of human performance are increasingly critical for successful graduate-level employment, entrepreneurship and career progression in the 4th industrial revolution.

    This module will provide you with the opportunity to identify the skills, competencies and experience required for successful development prior to embarking on your university degree. It also aims to help to inform you about your future direction of study as well as providing useful insights into your potential and abilities. You will begin to recognise the areas for your own personal professional development (including emotional, social, physical, cultural and cognitive intelligences) through taught and workshop activity.

    Central to the developmental process will be for each student to cultivate the reflective skills, openness and self-awareness to enable themselves to assess what they are doing, identify areas for improvement, and confidently receive and give constructive feedback. You should also begin to acquire a range of skills in observation, research & reviewing methods, critical thinking, writing and communication.

  • Core Modules
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    Design Investigation 1

    The module aims to introduce students to the skills, processes and practices involved in a spatial design project. It engages students in a range of processes by means of which they can understand, think about and engage with the academic and practical design discipline of architectural design.

    The module enables students to develop an understanding of space and materials. It familiarizes students with methods for fabricating models, prototypes, 2D and 3D drawings, sketches, diagrams, collage, photographs and mixed media representations, and to practice their use in generating and communicating ideas.

    The module supports experiment, trial and error through short projects and exercises that build confidence and competence. It introduces students to the role of representation in design and links with art practice as well as an understanding of the materials, processes and techniques that apply specifically to spatial design.

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    Mental Wealth: Professional Life 1

    Developing the key psychological and physical determinants of human performance are increasingly critical for successful graduate-level employment, entrepreneurship and career progression in the 4th industrial revolution.

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills, competencies and experience required for successful development to, and in, a range of potential future career areas.

    Herein they will begin to recognise the areas for their own personal professional development (including emotional, social, physical, cultural and cognitive intelligences) through taught and workshop activity.

    Central to the developmental process is for each student to cultivate the reflective skills, openness and self-awareness to enable themselves to assess what they are doing, identify areas for improvement, and confidently receive and give constructive feedback. Students will additionally develop knowledge of strategies to advance their own physical intelligence through ‘life style’ and ‘self care’ approaches to inform their health and wellbeing.

    Having acquired understanding of the key developmental areas, students will have opportunity to pitch a smallscale design project to a panel of practitioners, and be mentored and supervised by students from higher years. In this position they will learn and begin to apply the cognitive, cultural and social intelligences developed elsewhere in their studies (and from external activities) as required in the workplace, namely cognitive flexibility, emotional resilience, motivation, ethical decision-making, managing your audience, coordinating with others, negotiation, creativity, active listening, attention, problem solving, research, synthesis and analysis.

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    History and Theory 1

    The module aims to orient and critically engage the student in the subject of architecture and interior design in their relationship with art and design culture through engaging with selected histories and theories relevant to art, culture, technology and contemporary practice.

    Whilst beginning to develop a sound knowledge in their field, students are encouraged to see, read and articulate connections between developments in architecture and contemporary practice.

    The module introduces students to the range of academic researching, analysing and essay writing tools they need to produce graduate-level discussions and writing, while encouraging them to articulate and take responsibility for the development of their own learning and to be able to reflect critically on their own work and that of others.

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    Technical Studies and Representation 1

    The module aims to prepare students for the task of visualising and communicating their work at all stages of its development, and setting their work in relation to the final design project Design Investigation, Design Resolution and Design Integration and the technical demands of the design proposal.

    In this regard, drawing ability is a necessary skill for observation, recording, analysis, visualisation, evaluation and communication of different technical aspects of the design project.

    This module aims to develop a student's repertoire of practical, technical and computer-aided skills that can keep pace with their growing knowledge of the design process.

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    Design Resolution 1

    The module enables students to produce imaginative, appropriate and competent design proposals in response to a variety of sites, briefs, cultural, social and technological issues. Furthermore it aims to develop a general understanding of the materials, processes and techniques that are applied in the architectural design discipline. 

    The module aims to develop the student’s confidence and ability to apply a range of communication methods and media to present their design proposals clearly and effectively as well as an ability to evaluate and rework ideas in response to review and feedback.

    The module supports the ability of students to see and reflect on how their design proposals are beginning to develop into fully-fledged architecture design projects, and the kind of work and thinking involved in taking their ideas further. Therefore the module familiarises students with design development processes including the analysis and interpretation of a range of project sites and the development of project specific research. The module demonstrates strategies for producing spatial, material and programmatic ideas that satisfy aesthetic as well as technical requirements and how to present them using a range of appropriate media and methods of communication.

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    Design Integration 1

    This module provides an understanding of the climate and environment as an integral part of the design process. It seeks to help students develop an understanding of the role that environmental design plays in facilitating occupants’ satisfaction and comfort in the indoor environment.

    The module aims to create an awareness of the issues influencing the environmental and technical considerations of building design.

  • Core Modules
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    Design Investigation 2

    The module provides a forum for the student to develop a creative, inventive and productive design process in relation to a design project or projects. In particular to raise student awareness and understanding of the occupants and users and their physical, social and psychological needs through the design of both objects and environments at appropriate scales, as well as exploring key characteristics of design projects.

    There is a particular focus on investigations of site and context that may involve the gathering of empirical data, making analytical studies and conducting observations of people, place, context and materials that are appropriate to the project.

    By setting one design project, the module aims to engage with the practices, protocols and conventions that apply to the design and delivery of projects within the design and construction industry. The module fosters the development of a personal position and working methods as part of the attributes required by a professional architect.

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    Mental Wealth: Professional Life 2

    Developing the key psychological and physical determinants of human performance are increasingly critical for successful graduate-level employment, entrepreneurship and career progression in the 4th industrial revolution.

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to apply several of the skills, competencies and experience required for successful development to, and in, a range of potential future career areas.

    Herein they will advance the areas identified at level 4 for their own personal professional development (including emotional, social, physical, cultural and cognitive intelligences) through taught and workshop activity.

    This module will help students develop: an understanding of job market forces and influences; required skills to enable them to make successful applications for a job in the architecture sector; effective representation in interviews; opportunities to gain work experience in an architectural practice (as a placement) to learn more about how to apply their knowledge and learning in practice.

    Through engagement with the Career Passport, students will reflect on the success of the strategies that they employed to further develop their reflective skills, self-awareness, ‘life style’ and ‘self care’ approaches and where necessary improve their approaches.

    Students who would not gain work experience at an architectural practice will have opportunity to select an in house microbusiness to join in the role of ‘Producer’. In this position they will take on a specific production role, working collaboratively with peers and academic staff on a live project. In doing so they will apply the cognitive, cultural and social intelligences learnt elsewhere in their studies (and external development) required in the workplace.

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    History and Theory 2

    The module aims to orient and critically engage the student in the subject of architecture and interiors and also in its relationship with urbanism and urban space through engaging with selected histories and theories and through engagement with relevant art, culture, technology and contemporary practice.

    The history and theory element further prepares students as independent and critical thinkers, capable of producing a sustained piece of study in the form of a written essay. The module sets out the resources and methods, and rehearses the thinking, historical, analytical and discursive skills that will be required in relation to architecture and interior design.

    Throughout the module students are supported to think creatively and to take more responsibility for the development of their own learning and academic and professional direction whilst examining broader ethical questions resident in the practice of design.

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    Technical Studies and Representation 2

    The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to engage with the technical demands of the main design project in Design Investigation 2, Design Resolution 2 and Design Integration 2, and to represent this appropriately.

    This module builds upon and extends the knowledge, skills and understanding gained in Technical Studies and Representation 1 in that it continues to develop the student's repertoire of conceptual, practical, technical and computer-aided skills in order to be able to inform, support and describe their architectural design development.

    The module aims to:

    · Provide an overview of the principles of architectural structures, material construction and sustainable design.

    · Provide students with a range of representational and descriptive skills in order to record, analyse, visualise, develop, evaluate and communicate architectural design and observations.

    · Allow students to learn and apply representational skills to a design project across a range of drawing scales and details.

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    Design Resolution 2

    The aim of this module is to rehearse the production of more complex design projects in preparation for the final project undertaken in the final year. It also opens up the range of opportunities available to a student of architectural design looking to work in a discipline which is extremely varied, but where individual practices often specialise. The module therefore allows for a degree of choice in relation to the design unit and therefore the project type and site.

    Running in parallel with Design Integration 2, students are equipped with a brief and during the course of the module deliver a resolved design project that will become both spatially and materially coherent across a number of scales.

    The module fosters the development of a personal position and working methods as part of the attributes required by a designer. The student also develops the capability of testing and evaluating the potential impact of their design proposals on the users and the broader environment.

    Students are expected to offer articulate explanations of their proposals, be able to discuss their design considerations, present their case for specific social and environmental strategies and demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between materials, technology and the execution of their design.

    The design process continues to be expansive and exploratory, and emphasizes the creative and imaginative thinking involved. Working within vertical design units, students are also encouraged to cultivate a shared understanding of their project contexts and their briefs enabling them to work collaboratively, share tasks and review each other’s work

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    Design Integration 2

    This module focuses on the application of knowledge of environmental principles into the student's design projects, using relevant methods of environmental strategies as part of the design process.

    The module aims to encourage integration of environmental design from the outset of a project, giving students the ability to reflect on appropriate environmental design strategies and explore these in a creative and rigorous manner.

  • Core Modules
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    Design Investigation 3

    The module consolidates skills and knowledge gained at Levels 4 and 5. Together with Design Resolution 3 and Design Integration 3 which requires highly detailed reflection on the integration of cultural, professional, technical and environmental issues within the design project, this set of 3 modules is intended to prepare students for independent practice, entry into the professional workplace, or for higher studies.

    Whilst improving a student’s practical skills and refining their ability to use them productively, the focus of this module is on developing a depth of knowledge and understanding about research and project development, appropriate to graduate level. It also aims to help students to offer evidence of self-management in respect of planning, monitoring, recording and evaluation within the portfolio work that is produced.

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    Mental Wealth: Professional Life 3

    The module will enable students to apply and develop a variety of skills based competencies explored at level 5, including: self-awareness and regulation; mindfulness; emotional resilience; motivation; ethical decision-making; active listening; self-discipline and management; attention; reaction and response time; cognitive and muscle memory; managing stress; physical resilience; subject knowledge; cognitive flexibility; managing an audience; co-ordinating with others, negotiation; creativity; leadership and entrepreneurship; service orientation; critical thinking; complex problem solving; research synthesis and analysis.

    Students will learn, develop and apply the following skills based competencies: a focus on service orientation, self-discipline & management, reaction & response time, cognitive & muscle memory, managing stress, critical thinking, complex problem-solving, research, and synthesis & analysis.

    The culture and context of practice, role of the architect / architectural technologist / interior designer and relationships within the construction industry. Topics also cover specialist software for presentation of design proposals.

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    History and Theory 3

    The module aims to critically engage the student in the subject of architecture and interiors with the related art and design technologies and human sciences through engaging with selected histories and theories, and by considering these in relation to architecture contemporary practice.

    This module provides a platform for ambitious individual work and it calls for graduate levels of achievement in the submission of an essay or dissertation about a subject relating to architecture, interiors, cities or politics. Students will receive guidance on critical thinking, the analysis of texts, information retrieval, time management, bibliography, referencing, acknowledgement and the requirements for essay presentation.

    Throughout the module students are required to think creatively and to take responsibility for the development of their own learning and academic and professional direction whilst examining broader questions resident in the practice of design.

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    Integrated Technology

    This module establishes a student’s ability to integrate the key areas of their technical design knowledge within the context of the final design project Design Investigation 3 Design Resolution 3 and Design Integration 3.

    The module provides an overview of the necessary design skills required to meet building users’ requirements within the constraints imposed by cost factors and building regulations.

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    Design Resolution 3

    The module consolidates skills and knowledge gained at Levels 4 and 5. Together with Design Investigation 3 and Design Integration 3 which requires highly detailed reflection on the integration of cultural, professional, technical and environmental issues within the design project, this set of three modules is intended to prepare students for independent practice, entry into the professional workplace, or for higher studies.

    Whilst improving their practical skills and refining their ability to use them productively, the focus in this module is on students demonstrating their ability as professionals: their capacity to define and analyse spatial and design problems, generate proposals, integrate knowledge derived from different fields and sources, produce socially relevant inhabitable spaces, design technically competent buildings of aesthetic quality, and to take into account issues relating to human comfort and sustainability.

    In this module the student is expected to draw on their previous experience as well as the agenda offered by their choice of design unit in order to formulate and communicate a resolved final design project that frames the specific aspects of architectural design that they are interested in.

    The module reiterates and supports the requirement to produce high quality design proposals that satisfy aesthetic and technical requirements, and for these to be presented using a range of suitably professional and appropriate media. It also aims to help students offer evidence of self-­‐management in respect of planning, monitoring, recording and evaluation within the portfolio that is produced.

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    Design Integration 3

    This module builds on the knowledge gained from the two pre-requisites above. It further explores the role that  key environmental variables inform a low energy building design. It helps students to reflect on appropriate environmental design strategies that respond to occupants’ needs, design brief, and climate.

    This module allows students to explore, identify and evaluate the interrelationships between the various environmental mechanisms and address them in a rigorous manner by developing design strategies that deliver comfortable environments for building users.

HOW YOU'LL LEARN

The heart of the course is the design studio, where you'll learn the strategies of architectural design through hands-on design project work. You'll also learn from lectures, and from reading and writing designed to stimulate your creative mind.

At the core of our teaching philosophy is the relationship that develops between students and our academic team, so we teach you in mainly small groups to ensure you have plenty of contact with your tutors and lecturers.

As well as excellent studios, our modern, purpose-built Docklands campus in the heart of east London's vibrant regeneration area features extensive wood, metal and digital fabrication workshops, photographic darkrooms, printing and computer suites.

You'll visit study sites and buildings, cities and landscapes in the UK and abroad. Each year there's an overseas study trip, and you can choose from a variety of different design units which often involve overseas travel.

At the end of the academic year, you'll exhibit your work at our summer showcase. There are also opportunities to enter competitions and win scholarships, individually or as part of a team.

You'll spend time with a personal tutor at least once a week to guide your academic development and ensure you have all the personal support you need.

HOW YOU'LL BE ASSESSED

Studio work is assessed within a design portfolio and supporting studies in the form of a bound report.

We provide students with feedback on their progress throughout the year during tutorials and crits.  Final assessment takes place at the end of each academic year. There are no closed book examinations.

CAMPUS and FACILITIES

Docklands Campus

Docklands Campus, Docklands Campus, London, E16 2RD

WHO TEACHES THIS COURSE

The teaching team includes qualified academics, practitioners and industry experts as guest speakers. Full details of the academics will be provided in the student handbook and module guides.

Heba Ehab Elsharkawy

Heba Ehab Elsharkawy is Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader for BSc (Hons) Architectural Design Technology.

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Christian Groothuizen

Christian Groothuizen is an Architect and Senior Lecturer in the School of Architecture, Computing and Engineering. He has previously taught at The Bartlett (UCL), Middlesex University and London Metropolitan University.

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What we're researching

At the University of East London we are working on the some of the big issues that will define our future; from sustainable architecture and ethical AI, to health inequality and breaking down barriers in the creative industries.

Our students and academics are more critically engaged and socially conscious than ever before. Discover some of the positive changes our students, alumni and academics are making in the world.

Please visit our Research section to find out more.

Studying architecture at UEL was really enjoyable, helping me to develop the necessary skills to become an architect. The hands-on approach that UEL gave me provided key knowledge in the field of architecture that's unique compared to anywhere else.

Kent Gin

Architecture, BSc (Hons), winner of 2014 RIBA/SOM Foundation Travel Fellowship

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

By completing this course successfully, you'll be exempt from Part 1 of the Architects Registration Board (ARB) examination. Exemption from all three parts allows you to register as an architect with the ARB.

Many of our students go on to study further, eventually becoming fully qualified architects. The majority stay on at the University of East London to study on our MArch (ARB/RIBA Part 2) course or our Landscape Architecture MA.

If you'd prefer to go straight into the world of work, the skills you'll have learned - analysis, creative thinking, using IT and communicating through drawings and words - will be useful in many other areas.

BSc (Hons) Architecture provides an excellent base for exploring a variety of employment opportunities and for further study in the field of design. Many architecture students go on to work in other creative industries such as animation, graphic design, computer game design, film, fashion, and interior design.

During your time with us you'll develop your own creativity, and you'll put together your own individual design portfolio to showcase your talents to potential employers after you graduate.

The portfolio is the primary tool for gaining employment and needs to show a broad range of skills and a level of maturity that proves you are ready to take on the challenge of a career in architecture

Explore the different career options you can pursue with this degree and see the median salaries of the sector on our Career Coach portal.