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Hydration, Nutrition and Cognition Research Unit

This unit explores the effect of hydration and drinking water on cognition and the effect of nutrition on cognition, the brain and mood.

We are particularly interested in the positive effects of water consumption on cognitive performance, both in children and in adults.Recent work in adults includes measuring hydration using bioelectrical impedance and relating this to cognitive performance measured using CANTAB. Recent work in children includes papers on the positive effects of water consumption on cognition.

The unit is also interested in the effect of nutrition on cognition, the brain and mood

Members

  • Dr Caroline Edmonds

Collaborators

  • Dr Elizabeth Isaacs
  • Dr Mark Gardner
  • Professor Alan Lucas

Recent papers

Publically available research outputs are available to download from UEL’s Research Open Access Repository (ROAR).

Edmonds, C.J., Crombie, R., & Gardner, M.R. (2013). Subjective thirst moderates changes in speed of responding associated with water consumption. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience; Nutritional influences on human neurocognitive functioning, 7, 363. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2013.00363

Edmonds, C., Crombie, R., Ballieux, H., Gardner, M.R., & Dawkins, L. (2013). Water consumption, not expectancies about water consumption, affects cognitive performance in adults. Appetite, 60(1 January 2013), 148–153. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.10.016

Ranpura, A., Isaacs, E., Edmonds, C.J., Rogers, M., Lanigan, J., Singhal, A., … Butterworth, B. (2013). Developmental trajectories of grey and white matter in dyscalculia. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 2(2), 56–64. doi:10.1016/j.tine.2013.06.007

Booth, P., Taylor, B., & Edmonds, C.J. (2012). Water supplementation improves visual attention and fine motor skills in schoolchildren.Education and Health, 30(3), 75–79.

Dawkins, L., Shahzad, F.-Z., Ahmed, S.S., & Edmonds, C.J. (2011). Expectation of having consumed caffeine can improve performance and mood. Appetite, 57(3), 597–600. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2011.07.011

Fewtrell, M., Edmonds, C.J., Isaacs, E., Bishop, N., & Lucas, A. (2011). Aluminium exposure from parenteral nutrition in preterm infants and later outcomes. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 70(3), 299–304.doi:10.1017/S0029665111000498

Edmonds, C.J. (2010). Does having a drink of water help children think? A summary of some recent findings. School Health, 6(5), 58–60.

Edmonds, C.J., Isaacs, E.B., Cole, T.J., Rogers, M., Lanigan, J., Singhal, A., … Lucas, A. (2010). The effect of intrauterine growth on verbal IQ scores in childhood: a study of monozygous twins. Pediatrics, 126(5), e1095-e1101. doi:10.1542/peds.2008-3684

Edmonds, C.J., & Jeffes, B. (2009). Does having a drink help you think? 6–7-year-old children show improvements in cognitive performance from baseline to test after having a drink of water. Appetite, 53(3), 469–472.10.1016/j.appet.2009.10.002

Edmonds, C.J., & Burford, D. (2009). Should children drink more water? The effects of drinking water on cognition in children. Appetite, 52(3), 776–779. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2009.02.010

Fewtrell, M.S., Bishop, N.J., Edmonds, C.J., Isaacs, E.B., & Lucas, A. (2009). Aluminum exposure from parenteral nutrition in preterm infants: bone health at 15-year follow-up. Pediatrics, 124(5), 1372–1379.doi:10.1542/peds.2009-0783

Edmonds, C.J., Isaacs, E.B., Visscher, P.M., Rogers, M., Lanigan, J., Singhal, A., … Deary, I.J. (2008). Inspection time and cognitive abilities in twins aged 7 to 17 years: age-related changes, heritability and genetic covariance. Intelligence, 36(3), 210–225.doi:10.1016/j.intell.2007.05.004

Media Interest

Drinking water improves exam grades, research suggests — By Katherine Sellgren

Students who take water into the examination hall may improve their grades, a study of 447 people found. Controlling for ability from previous coursework results, researchers found those with water scored an average of 5% higher than those without.

Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-17741653

Taking water into exams could boost grades — By Nick Collins

A study of university students found that those who brought drinks, especially water, with them as they sat their exams performed up to 10 per cent better than those who did not.

Read more: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/9211365/Taking-water-into-exams-could-boost-grades.html

How to do better in your exams: Drinking a glass of water can boost your results by a grade — By Fiona Macrae

Forget expensive private tutors and brain-boosting vitamins. The key to exam success could be as simple as a glass of water.Students who took a drink into the exam hall did up to 10 per cent better than those who did not — the difference between a grade.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2131276/How-better-exams-Drinking-glass-water-boost-results-grade.html#ixzz1sUNoSdgv

For better exam results simply have a drink of water — By Fiona Macrae
The key to exam success could be as simple — and as cheap — as a glass of water.
Children who have a drink of water before sitting tests fare up to a third better, researchers have found.
Read More >

New study shows children perform better in tests when properly hydrated
Should children drink more water? The effects of drinking water on cognition in children.
Study completed by Caroline Edmonds and Denise Burford, School of Psychology, University of East London
Read more >