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Professor Andrew Silke

Head of Criminology

Professor Andrew Silke (BSc Hons, AFBPsS, CSci, CPsych, PhD) holds a Chair in Criminology at the University of East London where he is the Head of Criminology, and the Programme Director for Terrorism Studies. He has a background in forensic psychology and criminology and has worked both in academia and for government. His primary research interests include terrorism, conflict, crime and policing, and he is internationally recognised as a leading expert on terrorism and low intensity conflict. He has over 100 publications including several books, with his most recent including Prisons, Terrorism & Extremism: Critical Issues in Management, Radicalisation and Reform (2013) and Terrorism: All That Matters (2014).

    Professor Silke’s current projects include a major new book for Hurst publishers, The Triumph of Terror, which is due for publication in 2017. He is also currently editing The Routledge Handbook of Terrorism and Counterterrorism, a massive overview of the current state of academic analysis and debate on terrorism and counterterrorism, as well as a detailed survey of key historical and contemporary terrorist groups and major counter-terrorism campaigns. He is also co-editing with colleagues Historical Perspectives on Organised Crime and Terrorism, an edited volume based upon the simple premise that historical accounts of organised crime and terrorism offer critically important lessons for understanding and responding to contemporary threats and phenomena.



    He serves by invitation on the United Nations Roster of Terrorism Experts. He is a member of the European Commission’s Radicalisation Awareness Network Centre of Excellence (RAN CoE) which works with practitioners to develop state-of-the-art knowledge to prevent and counter radicalisation to violent extremism. Prior to this, he served both on the European Commission’s European Network of Experts on Radicalisation and on the Commission’s Expert Group on Violent Radicalisation. Professor Silke also served on the British Psychological Society’s working group on the Psychological Risk Assessment of those Convicted or Detained under Terrorist Related Offences.



    He has worked with a variety of government departments and law enforcement and security agencies. In the United Kingdom these include, the Home Office, the Ministry of Justice, the Ministry of Defence, the UK prison service, the London Metropolitan Police as well as several other UK police forces. Overseas he has worked with the United Nations, the United States Department of Justice, the United States Department of Homeland Security, NATO, the European Defence Agency, the European Commission, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.



    He has provided research advice to the Royal Society in the UK and the National Academy of Sciences in the US. He has provided invited briefings on terrorism-related issues to Select Committees of the UK House of Commons and was appointed in 2009 as a Specialist Advisor to the House of Commons Communities and Local Government Committee for its inquiry into the UK Government's programme for preventing violent extremism. In 2010 he gave invited oral testimony before the Canadian Special Senate Committee on Anti-terrorism. He is a member of the Cabinet Office National Risk Assessment Behavioural Science Expert Group.



    Professor Silke's reputation has made him a regular contributor to debates within the media, particularly on issues relating to terrorism, crime and psychology. He appears regularly on news and current affairs programmes. His work has also been the focus of a number of documentaries primarily on issues relating to terrorism, but also on issues dealing with the psychology of conflict, and the psychology of crisis situations. These documentaries have been for the BBC (including two episodes of Horizon), National Geographic, Discovery Channel, CI Channel, History Channel, Biography Channel and Channel 5.



















    Collaborators

    • Aaron Winter
    • Anthony Richards
    • James Windle
    • John Morrison
    • test

    Overview

    Research

    Books



    Silke, A. (2014). Terrorism: All That Matters. London: Hodder and Stoughton.



    Silke, A. (Ed.). (2013). Prisons, Terrorism and Extremism: Critical issues in Management, Radicalisation and Reform. London: Routledge.


    Silke, A. (Ed.). (2011). The Psychology of Counter-terrorism. London: Routledge.


    Richards, A., Fussey, P. and Silke, A. (Eds.). (2011). Terrorism and the Olympics. London: Routledge.



    Chen, H., Reid, E., Sinai, J., Silke, A. and Ganor, B. (Eds.). (2008).Terrorism Informatics: Knowledge Management and Data Mining for Homeland Security. New York: Springer.


    Silke, A. (Ed.). (2004). Research on Terrorism: Trends, Achievements and Failures. London : Frank Cass.


    Silke, A. (Ed.). (2003). Terrorists, Victims and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences. Chichester : Wiley.


    Book Chapters



    Silke, A. and Brown, K. (2016). ‘‘Radicalisation’: The Transformation of Modern Understanding of Terrorist Origins, Psychology and Motivation.’ In Shashi Jayakumar (Ed.), State, Society, and National Security: Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century, pp.129-150. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing.



    O’Gorman, R. and Silke, A. (2015). ‘Terrorism as Altruism: An Evolutionary Model For Understanding Terrorist Psychology,’ in Max Taylor, Jason Roach, Ken Pease (eds.), Evolutionary Psychology and Terrorism, pp.149-163. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2015). ‘Understanding suicide terrorism: Insights from psychology, lessons from history,’ In J. Pearse (ed.), Investigating Terrorism, pp.169-179. Chichester: Wiley



    Silke, A. (2014). ‘Terrorists, extremists and prison: An introduction to the critical issues,’ in A. Silke (ed.), Prisons, Terrorism and Extremism: Critical Issues In Management, Radicalisation and Reform, pp.3-15. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2014). ‘Risk assessment of terrorist and extremist prisoners,’ in A. Silke (ed.), Prisons, Terrorism and Extremism: Critical Issues In Management, Radicalisation and Reform, pp.108-121. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2012). ‘Is the targeted assassination of terrorist suspects an effective response to terrorism? NO: The Case Against.’ In Richard Jackson and Samuel Sinclair (Eds.) Contemporary Debates on Terrorism. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2011). ‘Fire of Iolus: The role of state countermeasures in causing terrorism and what needs to be done.’ In John Horgan and Kurt Braddock (Eds.), Terrorism Studies: A Reader, pp.345-357. London: Routledge.



    Richards, A., Fussey, P. and Silke, A. (2011). ‘Towards an Understanding of Terrorism and the Olympics.’ In Anthony Richards, Pete Fussey and Andrew Silke(Eds.). Terrorism and the Olympics: Major Event Security and Lessons for the Future. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2011). ‘Understanding Terrorist Target Selection.' In Anthony Richards, Pete Fussey and Andrew Silke (Eds.). Terrorism and the Olympics: Major Event Security and Lessons for the Future. London: Routledge.



    Fussey, P., Richards, A. and Silke, A. (2011). ‘Critical Reflections on the Secure Olympiad: Conclusions and Ways Forward.’ In Anthony Richards, Pete Fussey and Andrew Silke(Eds.). Terrorism and the Olympics: Major Event Security and Lessons for the Future. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2011). ‘The psychology of counter-terrorism: critical issues and challenges.’ In Andrew Silke (Ed.). The Psychology of Counter-Terrorism, pp.1-18. London: Routledge.



    Browne, D. and Silke, A. (2011). ‘The Impact of the Media on Terrorism and Counter-terrorism’. In Andrew Silke (Ed.).The Psychology of Counter-Terrorism, pp.89-110. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2011). ‘Terrorists and extremists in Prison: Psychological Issues in management and reform.’ In Andrew Silke (Ed.). The Psychology of Counter-Terrorism, pp.123-134. London: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2010). ‘The Internet & Terrorist Radicalisation: The Psychological Dimension.’ In Hans-Liudger Dienel, Yair Sharan, Christian Rapp and Niv Ahituv (Eds.). Terrorism and the Internet: Threats, Target groups, Deradicalisation strategies. Amsterdam: IOS Press.



    Silke, A. (2009). ‘Contemporary Terrorism Studies: Issues in Research.’ In Jackson, R., Smyth, M.B. and Gunning, J. (Eds.) Critical Terrorism Studies: A New Research Agenda, pp.34-48. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2009). ‘Cheshire-Cat Logic: The recurring theme of terrorist abnormality in psychological research’ In Jeff Victoroff and Arie W Kruglanski (Eds). Psychology of Terrorism: Classic and Contemporary Insights, pp.95-108. New York: Psychology Press.



    Silke, A. (2008). ‘Research on Terrorism: A Review of the Impact of 9/11 and the Global War on Terrorism.’ In Chen, H., Reid, E., Sinai, J., Silke, A. and Ganor, B. (Eds.) Terrorism Informatics: Knowledge Management and Data Mining for Homeland Security, pp.27-50. New York: Springer.



    Silke, A. (2008). ‘Children, terrorism and counter-terrorism: Lessons in policy & practice’. In M. Ranstorp and P. Wilkinson (Eds.). Terrorism and Human Rights. London: Routledge.



    O’Leary, B. and Silke, A. (2007). ‘Understanding and Ending Persistent Conflicts: Bridging Research and Policy.’ In M. Heiberg, B. O’Leary and J. Tirman (Eds). Terror, Insurgency, and the State: Ending Protracted Conflicts, pp.387-426. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.



    Silke, A. (2007). ‘The Impact of 9/11 on Research on Terrorism.’ In M. Ranstorp (Ed.) Mapping Terrorism Research: State of The Art, Gaps and Future Direction, pp.76-93. London: Routledge.



    Brandon, S. and Silke, A. (2007). ‘Near- and long-term psychological effects of exposure to terrorist attacks.’ In Bongar, B., Brown, L., Beutler, L., Breckenridge, J. and Zimbardo, P. (Eds.) Psychology of Terrorism, pp.175-193. Oxford University Press.



    Silke, A. (2005). ‘Fire of Iolus: The role of state countermeasures in causing terrorism and what needs to be done’. In Tore Bjorgo (Ed.) Root Causes of Terrorism., pp.241-255. Oxford: Routledge.



    Silke, A. (2004). ‘Terrorism and the blind men’s elephant.’ In Alan O’Day (Ed.) Dimensions of Terrorism, pp.241-257. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate.



    Silke, A. (2004). ‘An Introduction to Research on Terrorism.' In Silke, A. (Ed.). Research on Terrorism: Trends, Achievements and Failures, pp.1-29. London : Frank Cass.



    Silke, A. (2004). ‘The Road Less Travelled: Trends in Terrorism Research.' In Silke, A. (Ed.). Research on Terrorism: Trends, Achievements and Failures, pp.186-213. London : Frank Cass.



    Silke, A. (2004). ‘The Devil You Know: Continuing Problems with Research on Terrorism.' In Silke, A. (Ed.). Research on Terrorism: Trends, Achievements and Failures, pp.57-71. London : Frank Cass.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘Irish Republican Army.' In P. Knight, (Ed.), Conspiracy Theories in American History: An Encyclopedia, pp.353-354. Santa Barbara , CA : ABC-CLIO.



    Silke, A (2003). ‘Fire of Iolaus: The role of state counter-measures in causing terrorism and what needs to be done.' In T. Bjorgo, (Ed.). Root Causes of Terrorism: Proceedings from an International Expert meeting in Oslo, 9-11 June 2003, pp.179-193. Oslo : Norwegian Institute of International Affairs.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘Preface.' In A. Silke, (Ed.). Terrorists, Victims and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences, pp.xv-xxi. Chichester : Wiley.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘Becoming a Terrorist.' In A. Silke, (Ed.). Terrorists, Victims and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences, pp.29-53. Chichester : Wiley.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘The Psychology of Suicidal Terrorism.' In A. Silke, (Ed.). Terrorists, Victims and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences, pp.93-108. Chichester : Wiley.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘Retaliating against terrorism.' In A. Silke, (Ed.). Terrorists, Victims and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences, pp.215-231. Chichester : Wiley.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘The Psychological Impact of Terrorism: Lessons from the UK Experience.' In D. Das and P. Kratcoski, (Eds.), Meeting the Challenges of Global Terrorism: Prevention, Control, and Recovery, pp.189-202. Lanham , MD. : Lexington Books.



    Silke, A. (2001). ‘Chasing Ghosts: Offender profiling and terrorism.' In D. Farrington, C. Hollin, and M. McMurran, (Eds.). Sex and Violence: The Psychology of Crime and Risk Assessment. London : Harwood. pp.242-258


    Articles


    Silke, A. (2016). ‘Ferocious Times: The IRA, the RIC, and Britain’s failure in 1919-1921.’ Terrorism and Political Violence.



    Silke, A. and Schmidt-Petersen, J. (2015). ‘The Golden Age? What the 100 most cited articles in Terrorism Studies tell us,’ Terrorism and Political Violence



    Silke, A. (2011, May 14). ‘Craven Images.’ New Scientist, 210/2812, pp.24-25.



    Silke, A. (2011). ‘Disengagement or Deradicalization: A Look at Prison Programs for Jailed Terrorists.’ CTC Sentinel, 4/1, pp.18-21.



    Silke, A. (2010). ‘Ebbing Tide: The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the UK.’ RUSI Monitor, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp.1-3.



    Silke, A. (2008). ‘Holy Warriors: Exploring the Psychological Processes of Jihadi Radicalisation.’ European Journal of Criminology, 5/1, pp.99-123.



    Silke, A. (2008). ‘Target-hardening and Terrorism: Challenges and Risks.’ Journal of Counterterrorism and Homeland Security International, 14/2, pp.26-28.



    Silke, A. (2008). ‘How to spot terrorist surveillance.’ Police Review, 116/5973, pp.28-29.



    Silke, A. (2007). ‘Risk Assessment of Terrorist Prisoners.’ Forensic Update, 92, p.19.



    Silke, A. (2007). ‘The Psychological Impact of the Continued Terrorist Threat.’ National Strategy Forum Review, 17/1, pp.13-16.



    Silke, A. (2007). ‘Looking on.’ Police Review, 115/5936 , pp.24-25.



    Silke, A. (2006). ‘The Role of Suicide in Politics, Conflict and Terrorism.’ Terrorism and Political Violence, 18/1, pp.35-46.



    Silke, A. (2006). ‘The psychology of terrorism.’ Science and Public Affairs, June, pp.14-15.



    Silke, A. (2005). ‘Success & Failure in Terrorist Investigations: Research and lessons from Northern Ireland.’ Low Intensity Conflict and Law Enforcement, 13/3, pp.250-261.



    Silke, A. (2005). ‘Children, terrorism and counter-terrorism: Lessons in policy & practice’. Terrorism and Political Violence, 17/1-2, pp.201-213.



    Silke, A. (2005). ‘Terrorist Threats to the UK Homeland: 7/7 and Beyond’.Journal of Counterterrorism and Homeland Security International.



    Silke, A. (2004) ‘Terrorism, 9/11 and Psychology.' The Psychologist, 17, pp.518-521.



    Silke, A. (2004) ‘Courage in Dark Places: Reflections on Terrorist Psychology'. Social Research, 71/1, pp.177-198.



    Silke, A. (2003) ‘Deindividuation, anonymity and violence: Findings from Northern Ireland '. Journal of Social Psychology, 143/4, pp.493-499.



    Silke, A. (2003) ‘Beyond Horror: Terrorist Atrocity and the Search for Understanding – The Case of the Shankill Bombing'. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 26/1, pp.37-60.



    Demetriou, C. and Silke, A. (2003) ‘A criminological internet ‘sting': Experimental evidence of illegal and deviant visits to a website trap.' The British Journal of Criminology, 43, pp.213-222.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘Profiling terror.' Police Review, 111/5737 , pp.18-20.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘The psychological cost of terrorism.' Forensic Update, 72, pp.23-29.



    Silke, A. (2003). ‘Unsolved mysteries.' Police Review, 111/5716, pp.20-21.



    Silke, A. (2002). ‘Understanding terrorism.' Psychology Review, 9/1, pp.17-19.



    Silke, A. (2002). ‘Hunting Terror: Using Offender Profiling to Catch Terrorists'. Journal of Counterterrorism and Homeland Security International, 8/2, pp.28-30.



    Silke, A. (2002). ‘The psychological cost of terrorism.' The Bulletin of the International Society for Research on Aggression, 24/2, pp.14-18.



    Silke, A. (2002). ‘Striking Back at Terrorism: Lessons from History.' Journal of Counterterrorism and Security International, 8/1, pp.12-14.



    Silke, A. (2001). ‘The Devil You Know: Continuing Problems with Research on Terrorism.' Terrorism and Political Violence, 13/4, pp.1-14.



    Silke, A. (2001). ‘Terrorism: An Action Plan.' The Psychologist, 14/11, pp.580-581.



    Silke, A. (2001). ‘When Sums go Bad: Mathematical Models and Hostage Situations.' Terrorism and Political Violence, 13/2, pp.49-66.



    Silke, A. (2001). ‘Behind the Masks.' Police Review, 109/5640, pp.20-21.



    Silke, A. (2001). ‘Dealing with Vigilantism: Issues and lessons for the police.' The Police Journal, 74, pp.120-133.



    Silke, A. and Taylor , M. (2000). ‘War Without End: IRA and Loyalist Vigilantism in Northern Ireland .' Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, 39/3, pp.249-266.



    Silke, A. (2000). ‘Drink, Drugs and Rock'n'Roll: Financing Loyalist Terrorism in Northern Ireland - Part Two.' Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 23/2, pp.107-127.



    Silke, A. (2000). ‘Bitter Harvests: The Royal Ulster Constabulary's Response to Paramilitary Vigilantism in Northern Ireland .' Low Intensity Conflict & Law Enforcement, 9/2, pp.27-46.



    Silke, A. (2000). ‘ Beating the Water: The Terrorist Search for Power, Control and Authority.' Terrorism and Political Violence, 12/2, pp.76-96.



    Silke, A. (2000). ‘Acts of Sacrifice: Exploring the Impact of Paramilitary Vigilantism on Victims and Communities in Northern Ireland .' International Journal of Human Rights, 4/1, pp.1-24.



    Silke, A. (2000). ‘Profiling Terrorists: Lessons from the Unabomber Case.' Forensic Update, 61, pp.27-32.



    Silke, A. (1999). ‘Ragged Justice: Loyalist Vigilantism in Northern Ireland.’ Terrorism and Political Violence, 11/3, pp.1-31.



    Silke, A. (1999). ‘Rebel’s Dilemma: The changing relationship between the IRA, Sinn Fein and paramilitary vigilantism in Northern Ireland.’ Terrorism and Political Violence, 11/1, pp.55-93.



    Silke, A. (1998). ‘The Lords of Discipline: The Methods and Motives of Paramilitary Vigilantism in Northern Ireland.’ Low Intensity Conflict & Law Enforcement, 7/2, pp.121-156.



    Silke, A. (1998). ‘In Defence of the Realm: Financing loyalist terrorism in Northern Ireland - Part One: Extortion and blackmail’, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 21/4, pp.331-362.



    Silke, A. (1998). ‘Cheshire-Cat Logic: The recurring theme of terrorist abnormality in psychological research’, Psychology, Crime, and Law, 4/1, pp.51-69.



    Silke, A. (1997). ‘Honour and expulsion: Terrorism in Nineteenth-Century Japan.’ Terrorism and Political Violence, 9/4, pp.58-81.



    Silke, A. (1996). ‘Terrorism and the blind men’s elephant.’ Terrorism and Political Violence, 8/3, pp.12-28.







    Publications














    Funding

    Interests
















    Portfolio

    Professor Silke teaches and administers on a range of undergraduate and postgraduate modules at UEL including:

    Undergraduate
    • Crime, Deviance and Social History
    • Psychological Criminology
    • Terrorism Studies
    • Criminology Project

    Postgraduate
    • Critical Perspectives on Terrorism
    • Critical Perspectives on Counterterrorism

    He also supervises research dissertations for postgraduate students.


    PhD Supervison

    He is interested in supervising PhDs in areas focusing on terrorism and political conflict, organised crime, criminal investigation, and forensic psychology. Interested candidates are invited to contact him directly to discuss potential research.

    Teaching