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Dr Josie E. Malinowski

Lecturer in psychology

Psychology

I joined the University of East London as a Lecturer in Psychology in the spring of 2016. Prior to joining UEL I had a research position in the Swansea University Sleep Laboratory and a lectureship at the University of Bedfordshire. I completed my PhD researching the Continuity Hypothesis of dreaming at Leeds Metropolitan University in 2013. My academic research interests are primarily within the fields of sleep and dreaming; more broadly, I am interested in consciousness, altered states of reality, the default mode of thinking, embodied cognition, Conceptual Metaphor Theory, and much more. 

    I joined the University of East London as a Lecturer in Psychology in the spring of 2016. Prior to joining UEL I had a research position in the Swansea University Sleep Laboratory and a lectureship at the University of Bedfordshire. I completed my PhD researching the Continuity Hypothesis of dreaming at Leeds Metropolitan University in 2013. My academic research interests are primarily within the fields of sleep and dreaming; more broadly, I am interested in consciousness, altered states of reality, the default mode of thinking, embodied cognition, Conceptual Metaphor Theory, and much more. 



    Overview

    I am an "oneirologist": I conduct scientific research into the nature, form, function, experience, &c. of dreams. My interest in dreams started when I was a teenager, trying to discern meaning in my own dreams. In my early 20s, I became interested in dreams for their seeming limitless imaginative potential, for their creative power, for their intensity, humour, terror, and absurdity. I decided I wanted to dedicate my working life immersing myself in dreams, to try to discover what they are, what they can do, and what they may be for. I completed a PhD in 2013 entitled “How and Why We Dream of Waking Life: An Empirical Investigation into the Continuity Hypothesis of Dreaming”, which can be viewed here: http://tinyurl.com/hy6r6oc. Since then I have been involved in a number of projects researching various aspects of sleep and dreaming. An overview of a handful of these projects is detailed below, with some links for further reading. For a full list of my published academic work, see the “Publications” tab.

       

    Thought suppression and the dream rebound effect

    What happens to thoughts when we try to banish them from our minds? A number of experiments have found that suppressed thoughts often turn up in our dreams. This has been named the “dream rebound effect”. I am interested in researching this effect: whether it happens for some thoughts more than for others; whether there are individual differences in how it is experienced; what effect thought suppression has on mental health; and whether dream rebound moderates the effect of thought suppression on psychological well-being; etc.

    E.g. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/dream-factory/201511/why-unwanted-thoughts-can-invade-your-dreams 


    Time of night differences in dream content

    Do dreams change as we move from early night sleep, to sleeping in the morning? Many studies have shown that dreams had just after we fall asleep are very different to those we have just before we wake up, and there are clear measurable differences across the night. I am interested in researching these differences, and speculating as to why these differences occur; in particular, in mapping dream content differences on what we know about how memories are consolidated and transformed during sleep.

    E.g. http://time.com/3398931/bizarre-dreams/


    Getting personal insight through dreamwork

    Can working with our dreams help us to understand ourselves better? To many people it is obvious that the answer to this question is yes; yet, until recently, science has had little to say on the matter. Along with colleagues in Swansea University, I am attempting to provide empirical evidence for this question. Results so far indicate that dreamwork certainly can enable people to discover insights about their own lives through working with their dreams. 

    E.g. http://dreamstudies.org/2014/01/24/new-empirical-support-for-the-value-of-dream-sharing/


    Dreaming of emotional waking-life experiences

    Why do we dream of some things more than others? Much research has found that we tend to dream especially of things that happen in our waking lives that are very emotional. This may be because emotions “tell” us what is important to remember, and so we are more likely to re-experience in dreams these important events than ones that were less important. I am interested in researching the effect of emotion in wake-to-dream continuity, and theorising around why this effect exists: for example, for processing or consolidating emotional experiences during sleep/dreaming.

    E.g. http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01132/abstract



    Collaborators

    Funded by

    Research

    Most of my published articles can be found on my academic.edu page (https://uel.academia.edu/JosieMalinowski). If you would like access to a paper and cannot find it there please email me. 


    Journal articles

     

    Malinowski, J. E. (2015). Dreaming and personality: wake-dream continuity, thought suppression, and the Big Five Inventory. Consciousness & Cognition, 389-15, doi:10.1016/j.concog.2015.10.004.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C. L. (2015). Metaphor and hyperassociativity: the imagination mechanisms behind emotion assimilation in sleep and dreaming. Frontiers in Psychology, 6 (1132), 1-19.


    Horton, C. L. & Malinowski, J. E. (2015). Autobiographical memory and hyperassociativity in the dreaming brain: Implications for creativity and memory consolidation in sleep. Frontiers in Psychology, 6 (874), 1-14.


    Edwards, C., Malinowski, J. E., McGhee, S., Bennett, P., Ruby, R., & Blagrove, M. (2015). Comparing exploration-insight gains due to consideration of a recent dream and consideration of a recent event using the Ullman and Schredl dream group methods. Frontiers in Psychology, 6 (831), 1-10, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00831.


    Van Rijn, Eichenlaub, J-B,  E., Lewis, P., Walker, M., Gaskell, G., Malinowski, J. E., & Blagrove, M. (2015). The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during rapid-eye-movement sleep, but not during slow-wave-sleep. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, doi:10.1016/j.nlm.2015.01.009.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C. L. (2014). Memory sources of dreams: The incorporation of autobiographical rather than episodic experiences. Journal of Sleep Research, 23 (4), 441-7, doi: 10.111/jsr.12134.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C. L. (2014). The effect of time of night on wake-dream continuity. Dreaming, 24 (4), 253-269, doi:10.1037/a0037817.


    Malinowski, J. E., Fylan, F., & Horton, C. L. (2014). Experiencing “continuity”: A qualitative investigation of waking life in dreams. Dreaming, 24 (3), 161-175, doi:10.1037/a0037305.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C. L. (2014). Evidence for the preferential incorporation of emotional waking-life experiences into dreams. Dreaming, 24 (1), 18-31, doi:10.1037/a0036017.


    Edwards, C. L., Ruby, P. M., Malinowski, J. E., Bennett, P. D., & Blagrove, M. T. (2013) Dreaming and insight. Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (979), 1-14.


    Horton, C. L., & Malinowski, J. E. (2011). Re-defining discontinuity: Implications for the functions of dreaming. International Journal of Dream Research, Vol. 4 (2), pp.34-36.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C. L. (2011a). Themes of continuity. International Journal of Dream Research, Vol. 4 (2), pp. 86-92.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C.L. (2011b). Do we dream to process emotional waking experiences? : The incorporation of emotional stimuli in dreams. International Journal of Dream Research, 4 (1), S48.


     

    Conference presentations and invited talks


    Malinowski, J. E. (2016, February). 8 things science can tell us about lucid dreaming in 8 minutes. Presentation at Wellcome Collection, London.


    Malinowski, J. E. (2015, October). Metaphor and hyperassociativity: The imagination mechanisms behind emotion assimilation in sleep and dreaming. Invited talk at Swansea University.


    Blagrove, M. T., Edwards, C. L., McGee, S., & Malinowski, J. E. (2015, June). How much of the dream is continuous with waking life? Symposium conducted at the meeting of the International Association for the Study of Dreams 32nd Annual International Conference, June 5-9, 2015, Virginia.


    Edwards, C. L., Malinowski, J. E., Ruby, P., McGee, S., Bennett, P., & Blagrove, M. T. (2015, June). Connections between dream or event descriptions and prior waking experiences. Presentation at the International Association for the Study of Dreams 32nd Annual International Conference, June 5-9, 2015., Virginia.


    Edwards, C. L., Blagrove, M. T., Malinowski, J. E., McGee, S., Ruby, P., & Bennett, P. (2015, June). Insight in Ullman and Schredl dream groups. Presentation at the International Association for the Study of Dreams 32nd Annual International Conference, June 5-9, 2015, Virginia.


    Horton, C. L. & Malinowski, J. E. (2014, June). Dreams as a methodological tool: What can we rely on with dreamwork, and what is less reliable? Presentation at the International Association for the Study of Dreams 31st Annual International Conference, June 4-6, 2014,  California.


    Ashwill, B., Pannier, W., Hoss, R., Schredl, M., Barrett, D., Blagrove, M., Malinowski, J. E., Lasley, J., & Valli, K. (2014, June). Building collaboration between dream workers, dreamers, and dream researchers. Panel at the International Association for the Study of Dreams, 31st Annual International Conference, June 4-6, 2014 California.


    Malinowski, J. E. (2013, November). The Science of Dreaming. Invited talk given at the Northwood United Synagogue.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C.L. (2013, June). The Continuity Questionnaire. Poster presentation at the International Association for the Study of Dreams 30th Annual International Conference, 21-25 June, Virginia.


    Malinowski, J. E., & Horton, C.L. (2012, June). Themes of Continuity. Presentation at the International Association for the Study of Dreams 29th Annual International Conference, 22-26 June, California.


    Malinowski, J. E. & Horton, C. L. (2011, August). Episodic and autobiographical memory in dreams. International Conference on Memory V, P102, p.119.

    Publications

    • Dr Josie Malinowski on ResearchGate

      Academic profile

      Click here
    • Dr Josie Malinowski on academia.edu

      Academic profile

      Click here
    • Oneirology @josiemalinowski

      Twitter page

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    • Oneirology.co.uk

      Website & blog

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    Portfolio

    I teach on several modules from the BSc (Hons) Psychology programme:

    Applications of Psychobiology, Social Psychology, and Individual Differences (module co-leader)

    The Psychology of Belief (module co-leader)

    The Psychology of Mental Health

    Anomalistic Psychology

    Teaching