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The Centre on Human Rights in Conflict (CHRC)

Refugee camp

About us

The Centre on Human Rights in Conflict (CHRC) is an interdisciplinary centre that carries out academic and policy-orientated research in situations of military, political, cultural, social, economic conflict and in transition from authoritarian regimes. Our work addresses the complex and dynamic relationships between human rights and conflict, including:

  • Human rights violations as causes and consequences of conflict
  • Human rights claims as sources of conflict
  • Dilemmas of accountability in post-conflict situations
  • Human rights as a framework for resolving conflicts and building post-authoritarian societies.

The CHRC focuses on the interplay between international law and international politics and the legal, political and cultural contests about human rights.

Staff

Director

Professor Chandra Lekha Sriram joined the School of Law at the University of East London in 2005 as its inaugural Professor of Human Rights, when she also founded and directed the Centre on Human Rights in Conflict.  As director of the Centre, she raised collaborative grants from the British Academy, the United States Institute of Peace, the Leverhulme Trust, the European Union, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. From 2010-2013, she was Professor of Law at the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies. 

She returned to UEL as Professor of International Law and International Relations in 2013, accompanied by colleagues working on her new collaborative grant from the Economic and Social Research Council on the Impact of Transitional Justice Measures on Democratic Institution-building (www.tjdi.org).  This is a three-year project in conjunction with Anja Mihr at the University of Utrecht (funded by NWO), examining the long-term impact of transitional justice measures.

Professor Sriram has authored three books, edited or co-edited 11 books or special journal issues, and published over 100 articles and essays in the field of post-atrocity justice, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, including: Peace as governance: Power-sharing, armed groups and contemporary peace negotiations (2008); Globalizing justice for mass atrocities: A revolution in accountability (2005); and Confronting past human rights violations: Justice vs peace in times of transition (2004). Her coedited book, Transitional Justice and Peacebuilding on the Ground: Victims and Excombatants was published by Routledge in 2012. The successful War,Conflict and Human Rights textbook, co-authored with Olga Martin-Ortega and Johanna Herman was published in its second edition in 2014. She is the editor of Transitional Justice in the Middle East and North Africa, which will be published by Hurst and Oxford University Press in 2016.

Professor Sriram has twice been the chair of the International Studies Association Human Rights section, and is a co-chair of the London Transitional Justice Network. She is also the co-editor of a book series with Routledge on Law, conflict and international relations.

She received her PhD in Politics from Princeton University in 2000, her JD from the University of California-Berkeley in 1994, and her BA in Political Science and MA in International Relations from the University of Chicago in 1991.

All staff

Sally Holt, Senior Research Fellow and Deputy Director of CHRC

Sally Holt has held a variety of positions in intergovernmental organisations (IGOs), NGOs and UK universities working at the intersection of human rights, conflict, security and development. She specialises in minority rights and the social inclusion of marginalised communities. Before joining the CHRC in 2013, she was an Adviser to the Initiative on Quiet Diplomacy overseeing the development of practical resource materials and supporting engagement with conflict parties to address problems that impact negatively on human rights and commonly underlie tensions and conflict within societies. Previously she managed a research programme for the Aga Khan Foundation (UK) on the social inclusion of Muslim populations in Europe. She has also been a Research Fellow in the Department of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford where she undertook policy-oriented research for governments and IGOs on peacebuilding and long-term security and reintegration challenges. She has served as a Legal Officer for the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities (HCNM) and was subsequently contracted to help develop the HCNM’s Guidelines on Integration of Diverse Societies. Sally regularly undertakes consultancies for IGOs including the UN, OSCE and EU. Her most recent research and publications relate primarily to diversity management, conflict prevention and the role of women in building peace and security. She received her MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights from the University of London’s School of Advanced Studies in 1998.

Johanna Herman, Senior Research Fellow and Deputy Director of CHRC

Her areas of research interests include transitional justice, peacebuilding and human rights. Her most recent research is on the Khmer Rouge tribunal in Cambodia, focusing on the participation of victims as civil parties. She has also written on peacebuilding in Liberia and DDR and transitional justice. She has co-authored War, Conflict and Human Rights: Theory and Practice with her colleagues at the Centre and co-edited Transitional Justice and Peacebuilding on the Ground, Peacebuilding and Rule of Law in Africa: Just Peace? and Surviving Field Research: Working in Violent and Difficult Situations.Johanna Herman received her MA in International Affairs from Columbia University’s School of International And Public Affairs in 2006, with a concentration in human rights. She holds a BA in Social and Political Sciences from Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. She has worked in various capacities for UN-HABITAT and the United Nations Development Programme in Japan, Afghanistan and New York and has work experience with a number of international NGOs.

Members of the Centre on Human Rights in Conflict

Nicola Antoniou, Lecturer

Nicola is a part-time lecturer at UEL, teaching Evidence and Criminal Law on the LLB.

In addition to her lecturing, Nicola is a Supervising Solicitor at UEL’s Legal Advice Centre, where she supervises students who provide advice to the local community on the following areas of law: contract/consumer; housing; employment and social security matters. 

Nicola and Patrick Hassan-Morlai are currently undertaking research on clinical legal education to present at a conference at Palacký University, Czech Republic. 

When Nicola is not at UEL, she works as a consultant Solicitor Advocate for a leading Legal 500 law firm in London, where she specialises in criminal defence work. Nicola has her Higher Rights of Audience, which means that she can conduct matters in the higher courts.

Barry Collins, Senior Lecturer

Barry Collins teaches Law and Society, Human Rights, Employment Law and Tort law. His main interest is in the field of legal theory, particularly as it relates tothemes of nationalism, constitutionalism and conflict resolution. His publications to date have brought perspectives from legal and psychoanalytical theory to bear on Irish Constitutional Law and on conflict resolution in Northern Ireland and the Middle East. He is also currently working on a PhD around these topics.

In 2003, he was a visiting scholar at the Socio-Legal Research Centre at the Griffith University, Australia, and he has organised conferences around the theme of Law and Cultural Studies at the Oñati International Institute for the Sociology of Law, Spain.

Jeremie Gilbert, Professor

Jérémie Gilbert is Professor of Comparative and International Law. His main area of research is on international human rights law, and more particularly the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples. He has published various articles and book chapters on the rights of indigenous peoples, looking in particular at their right to land. His latest monograph is 'Indigenous Peoples’ Land Rights under International Law: From Victims to Actors' (Brill, 2007).  He is a member of Minority Rights Group International’s Advisory Board on their Legal Cases Programme, a board member of the International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) and also regularly works with the Forest Peoples’ Programme. He was one of the invited independent experts for United Nations Expert Seminar on Treaties and other arrangements between States and Indigenous Peoples. His current work focuses on the protection of nomadic peoples under international law, minority rights in Africa, and the interaction between business and human rights law.

Costantino Grasso, Lecturer

Costantino Grasso is Lecturer in Law at UEL, visiting lecturer at Queen Mary University of London and Global MBA module leader for Corporate Governance and Ethics at the University of London. His foremost areas of research are financial crime, corporate governance and corporate social responsibility. In particular, in the latest years, he has focused on corporate criminal liability and on the effectiveness of corporate and compliance measures to counter financial crime offences such as bribery and corruption, fraud, tax evasion, money laundering and terrorism financing. He has also conducted comprehensive studies on European criminal law, economic sanctions, corruption in the oil and gas sector, transitional justice, as well as energy trade and governance. His research has always been inspired by the necessity of taking into consideration the protection of fundamental rights and, in particular, the right to a fair trial and due process. He is the author of various articles, chapters and volumes both in English and Italian.

In 2012, he was selected as an international expert and rapporteur for the European Union Project ‘Prevention of fraud, corruption and bribery committed through legal entities for the purpose of financial and economic gain’ led by the T.M.C. Asser Institute in cooperation with the Dutch Ministry of Justice.

Being qualified as a solicitor in England and Wales and as a lawyer in Italy, he has always combined academic activities with legal practice. In 2014, he worked as a corporate governance and compliance specialist for the Serious Fraud Office participating in the first-ever U.K. Deferred Prosecution Agreement between that prosecuting body and ICBC Standard Bank Plc, which concerned a complex case of transnational bribery. On that occasion, he received an award for the substantial input into the success of the agreement.

Maja Korac-Sanderson, Reader

Maja Korac-Sanderson co-directs the Centre for Social Justice and Change, and co-leads MA in Refugee Studies, both at the School of Social Sciences, UEL. Maja’s research is in the area of conflict, gender, migration and integration. Her special area of interest is the role of gender in conflict and conflict resolution within the conceptual framework of social capital. Within this framework her research examines how bonding and bridging connections shaping conflict situations as well as peace-building processes are gendered.

Maja is one of the founding members of the Women in Conflict Zones Network (WICZNET), an international network of scholars, policymakers and grassroots women’s groups from around the world. Maja has held positions at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (Britain), Centre for Refugee Studies and the Centre for Feminist Research, York University (Canada), and University of Belgrade (Yugoslavia/Serbia). She has experience of consultancy work for governments and non-governmental organisation.

Maja Korac-Sanderson’s books include - Remaking Home: Reconstructing Life, Place and Identity in Rome and Amsterdam, Berghahn Books Oxford 2009; Linking Arms: Women and war in post-Yugoslav States, Life & Peace Institute, Uppsala 1998, and Captives of Their Sex:  Social Identity of Young Rural Women Between Traditional Culture and Contemporary Values, the Institute for Sociological Research, University of Belgrade 1991 (published in Serbian). She co-edited Feminist under Fire: Exchanges across War Zones, Toronto: Between the Lines 2003, and Women in Conflict Zones, Special Issue, Canadian Women’s Studies, 2000, 19:4, York University Publications. She has also published widely in academic journals such as Journal of Refugee Studies, Sociology (BSA), and Women’s International Studies Forum. Email: m.korac@uel.ac.uk

Tim Hall, Principal Lecturer

Tim Hall undertakes research and teaches on justice, rights, ethics and the politics of work. His main areas of interest are Marxism and Frankfurt School critical theory. His publications include The Modern State: theories and ideologies (Edinburgh 2007) with Erika Cudworth and John McGovern and The Fundamental Dissonance of Existence (Continuum 2010) with Timothy Bewes. He is currently writing a book on the political thought of Theodor Adorno. In addition he has an interest in state theory and international ethics and is currently researching Marxist state theory and Cosmopolitan political theory. He is actively engaged with local community organisations such as London Citizens, an alliance of over 150 religious and civic groups working together on campaigns relating to issues of common concern such as work, security and housing. He is also linked in to extensive networks of civil society organisatons and movements working with vulnerable people across the UK.

Patrick Hassan-Morlai Koroma

Patrick Hassan-Morlai Koroma currently lectures on the LLB programme at the University of East London. He has taguht on undergraduate and postgraduate modules.  Patrick is also the Director of the Legal Advice Centre (a law clinic) and works with a team of academic and administration staff members who manage and develop the law clinic. Patrick also works with a team of volunteer student advisers and solicitors who offer their time on a pro bono basis to provide free legal advice to members of the public in East London.

Catherine Hobby, Senior Lecturer

Catherine Hobby has taught at UEL for over seventeen years and is, at present, employed part-time. Before becoming a full-time member of staff in 1993 she was a consultant and helped establish the charity Public Concern at Work. She works in the areas of Employment Law, Industrial Relations, Public Law and Human Rights. She currently teaches modules on Constitutional & Administrative Law and Human Rights on the LLB degree course.

Edel Hughes, Senior Lecturer

Edel Hughes graduated from University College Cork, Ireland, in 2002 with a BCL (Law and French). She was awarded an LLM and PhD degrees in International Human Rights Law from the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2003 and 2009 respectively.  Prior to joining the University of East London, she was a lecturer in law at the School of Law, University of Limerick, between 2006 and 2011. Edel has worked as a lecturer with Amnesty International (Irish Section) and in recent years has engaged in research and advocacy work for various non-governmental human rights organisations including Relatives for Justice and the Kurdish Human Rights Project.

Annalisa Meloni, Senior Lecturer

Dr Annalisa Meloni graduated with a LLB in English and European Laws from the University of Essex in 1998. She then studied at University College London where she received her LLM in 1999 and her PhD in 2005. Her research interests focus on the European Union's laws and policies relating to external border controls.

Dr John Morrison, Reader

Dr John Morrison is Director of the University of East London’s Terrorism and Extremism Research Centre. He is an expert on violent dissident Irish republicanism, organisational fragmentation and broader issues relating to the psychology of terrorist involvement. He is an editorial board member of Perspectives on Terrorism and Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression. In 2016, alongside Dr Paul Gill of University College London, he co-edited a special issue of Terrorism and Political Violence that looked at one hundred years of Irish Republican paramilitary activity from 1916 to 2016. In 2014 his first book The Origins and Rise of Dissident Irish Republicanism was published with Bloomsbury Academic Press. Prior to joining UEL John was a postdoctoral research fellow at the International Center for the Study of Terrorism (ICST) at Pennsylvania State University. Within this role he was the project manager of ICST’s research on modern-day dissident Irish Republican organisations. Dr Morrison’s current research interests relate to the role of trust in terrorist decision-making, violent dissident Irish republicanism, and expert novice differences in terrorist activity.

Anthony Richards, Reader

Anthony Richards is a Reader in Terrorism Studies in the School of Business and Law at the University of East London, where he teaches on the MSc Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Critical Perspectives on Counter-Terrorism modules. He is the author of Conceptualizing Terrorism which was published with Oxford University Press in September 2015. He was the lead editor for the volume Terrorism and the Olympics: Major event security and lessons for the future (London: Routledge, 2011) and has published on a wide variety of other terrorist related themes including radicalisation and extremism, UK counter-terrorism, British public and Muslim attitudes towards both terrorism and counter-terrorism, homeland security, and terrorism in Northern Ireland. He has spoken at various conferences and convened a panel at the British International Studies Association 2015 annual conference on the meaning of terrorism. He has also contributed to briefings on terrorism and radicalisation at the Home Office and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

John Strawson, Honorary Professor of Law 

John Strawson was former Director and Co-Director of the CHRC (2010-2015).  He is a colonial legal historian with contemporary interests in International law, the Middle East and Islamic Law. He has written on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic law in colonial India, Law and September 11 2011, the Iraq war and the Arab Spring. His current interests include conflict resolution and the transitional process in the Middle East and the implications of colonial rule for current images of Islamic law.
He has held visiting positions at the International Institute for Social Sciences in Netherlands (now of the Erasmus University Rotterdam), the Institute of Law at Birzeit University, Palestine and was visiting professor of law at the International Islamic University Malaysia in 2007. He has held research grants from the British Council, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the British Academy.  He broadcasts on international law, the Middle East and Islamic Law.

His publications include (as editor) Law after Ground Zero (GlassHouse/Routldege-Cavendish 2002), Partitioning Palestine: Legal Fundamentalism in the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (Pluto Press, 2010) and co-editor (with Barry Collins) of Iraq and Human Rights a special issue of the International Journal on Contemporary Iraqi Studies, (Vol. 5. No. 3 (2011).

Aaron Winter, Senior Lecturer

Dr. Aaron Winter, BA Honours in Political Science (York, Canada), MA in Philosophy and Social Theory (Warwick, UK), DPhil in Social and Political Thought (Sussex, UK), is Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice at UEL. His research is on organised racism, right-wing extremism, terrorism and hate crime (with a particular focus on the US, Canada and Britain) and has been interviewed about these by the BBC, CBC, The Times, LBC and Dundee Courier. He is co-editor of Discourses and Practices of Terrorism: Interrogating Terror (Routledge, 2010), New Challenges for the EU Internal Security Strategy (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013) and Reflexivity in Criminological Research Experiences with the Powerful and the Powerless (Palgrave, 2014). He has also contributed to Religion and Violence: An Encyclopedia of Faith and Conflict (M.E.Sharpe, 2010), Encyclopedia of American Street Crime (Sage, 2013) and several edited collections including Extremism in America (University Press Florida, 2014). He is a Trustee of the British Sociological Association (BSA), co-convener of the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group, coordinator of the Race, Ethnicity and Migration Stream for the BSA Annual Conference and on the editorial board of the journal Sociological Research Online.
Professor Tom Hadden

Tom Hadden is Emeritus Professor at the School of Law, Queen’s University, Belfast and was appointed as a Visiting Fellow at the CHRC to enable collaboration specifically on work relating to minority rights, integration and social cohesion. Prof. Hadden has written extensively in the field of human rights law, including issues of emergency law and minority rights, and is a recognised expert in these fields. He has worked with the UN Working Group on Minorities, the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities on issues of integration and separate provision for minorities.

For a long period Prof. Hadden was actively involved with his colleague Prof. Kevin Boyle in the search for a political settlement in Northern Ireland and in 1996 they were commissioned by the Irish Government to write a study on The Protection of Human Rights in the Context of Peace and Reconciliation in Ireland.  Prof. Hadden has served as a Member of the Standing Advisory Commission of Human Rights for Northern Ireland (1985-1990) and a part-time Commissioner at the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (1999-2005). More recently, he was instrumental in the development in 2013 of The Belfast Guidelines on Amnesty and Accountability

Prof. Hadden is working with the CHRC's Sally Holt to develop a project on Settled Immigrant Communities in the New Europe

Farid Mohammed Rashid

‌Farid studied his BA in law (2004), at Aleppo University, Syria. He completed his LLM in International Law and Criminal Justice in 2010 at the University of East London, UK. His doctoral project is entitled "An examination of the prosecution strategy at the ICC in the context of establishing the legitimacy of international legal institutions." This project explores the confines of the Prosecutorial discretion of the ICC Prosecutor through critically analysing the criteria of the exercise of the discretionary function, as laid down in the ICC Statute during all stages of initiating investigations and prosecutions. Also, it sheds light on the Prosecutor's power in securing cooperation from international actors to give effect to his or her discretionary decisions. The research will be framed within the tension between law and politics through discussing critically the objectivity theory of international law and international principle. It further examines the relationship between international law and international politics in the context of the prosecutorial discretion of international crimes. The Project will be mainly focusing on the Darfur situation as a case study.


Mertkan Hamit 

Mertkan's PhD project is entitled: "Re-thinking about the universality of human rights and the reflections of the human rights discourse on the identity issue in Cyprus". His research aims to interrogate universality of the human rights discourse in the light of the critical legal theory. The case study will be focusing on the human rights discourses in two parts of Cyprus. Cyprus conflict is one of the frozen conflicts, and it is sustained, in addition to many other factors also with the antagonism in many spheres to the “other” side. From this perspective human rights discourses in Cyprus will be analyzed in order to provide a basis to make the critic of the universality. While doing this, the identity and the human rights discourses will be elaborated together, in order to understand if the human rights are “universal” or it is merely “community centric”.


Sylvie Namwase

Sylvie Namwase studied her BA in law (2008), at Makerere University, Uganda. She completed her LLM in Human Rights and Democratization in Africa in 2011 at the University of Pretoria, Centre for Human Rights, South Africa. Her doctoral project is entitled "The use of force against demonstrators: law enforcement versus crimes against humanity."  This project considers the recent spate of civilian uprisings against states, manifesting as public demonstrations, with some bordering on armed conflict and others eventually evolving into it. It explores numerous instances in which some states have retaliated with lethal force, provoking accusations of crimes against humanity from the international community, and the retaliatory arguments that such use of force constituted law enforcement in line with their national laws. The study posits that the current international regimes on right to life, crimes against humanity and certain concepts in international humanitarian law (IHL) which offer the closest universal standard on states’ use of force need to be comprehensively defined and their scopes clarified to adequately address the challenges presented by the interaction between law enforcement and armed conflict contexts, given the changing nature of mass demonstrations and civilian uprisings against the state. The study will be set against the background of rising social-economic pressures facing most Governments, the challenge that the notion of state sovereignty is increasingly presenting for the enforcement of international law and the danger this presents for the protection of the right to life. The study will draw from several countries in Africa including Uganda, South Africa, Sierra Leone and Egypt as examples as well as countries outside Africa such as Syria and Ukraine.


Sara Solmone

Sara Solmone studied her BA in International Communication at the University for Foreigners of Perugia (2005) and completed her LLM in International Relations in 2010 at the University of Perugia. The title of her doctoral project is “The concept of State jurisdiction online and respect for human rights in contemporary international law”. This project investigates both the concept of State jurisdiction online and the role played by States and non-State actors (such as Internet Service Providers - ISPs) in granting the fulfilment of human rights in the cyberspace. The research intends to determine whether and how the concept of State jurisdiction changes when human rights violations occur in the virtual space, rather than in a clearly identifiable physical location. The research intends to identify the positive and negative obligations that States must obey to guarantee human rights in cyberspace pursuant to the human rights conventions to which they are a signatory. The research also intends to establish how States comply with these obligations and the role played by non-State actors in granting the fulfilment of human rights in the cyberspace. An analysis of State jurisdiction on the Internet will be undertaken to understand which acts, whether commissive or omissive, the States must enforce to protect anyone who is subject to their jurisdiction from human rights violations on the Internet. Therefore, on the one hand, this analysis will help clarify the standards of protection that the States must achieve according to their ratified human rights conventions, the subjects towards whom this protection must be directed, and the applying limitations. On the other hand, the research will explain the positive obligations with which States must comply to promote human rights in cyberspace and how they fulfil these obligations. Considering that multiple actors influence and participate in regulating the Web to achieve the protection of human rights, the research also intends to interrogate the role of non-State actors in this process, such as ISPs.

Past Staff

Olga Martin-Ortega

Olga was a Senior Research Fellow at the CHRC (2006-2012) and member of the Management Team at the CHRC (2010-2012). Whilst at the CHRC she conducted research in the areas of business and human rights in conflict zones, post-conflict reconstruction and transitional justice. She lead the British Academy Small Grant “The role of hybrid courts in the institutional and substantive development of international criminal justice. A study of the War Crimes Chamber of the State Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina” (2010-2012) and participated in the large projects: “Transitional Justice as Peacebuilding?”, United States Institute For Peace Research Grant (2010-2012); “Just and Durable Peace by Piece”, European Union VII Framework Collaborative Project, coordinated by the University of Lund (Sweden) (2008-2011) and “Rule of law in African countries emerging from violent conflict: critical issues and cases”, British Academy Large Research Grant (2007-2010).

Valerie Arnould

‌Valerie Arnould was a Research Fellow on the research project looking at the impact of transitional justice measures on democratic institution-building (www.tjdi.org). The project was funded by the ESRC and undertaken in collaboration with the Netherlands Institute of Human Rights at Utrecht University. She holds a PhD and MA in War Studies from King’s College London, and degrees in international relations and international law from the Universite Libre de Bruxelles. Her dissertation focused on the domestic politics of transitional justice in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. After finishing her PhD she was a visiting lecturer on the human rights programme at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. She previously worked as a research fellow at the Royal Institute for International Relations (Egmont Institute) in Brussels, and as a senior analyst for Central Africa and francophone West Africa at a London-based strategic intelligence company. 

Elizabeth Rhoads

Elizabeth Rhoads was the Research Administrator on the research project looking at the impact of transitional justice measures on democratic institution-building (www.tjdi.org).  She received her M.A. in Human Rights Law from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in Cultural Anthropology with a concentration in Peace and Conflict Studies from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. Elizabeth is a former Fulbright Research Fellow (Indonesia, 2007-2008) and has spent four years working and researching in Southeast Asia. She has several years’ experience working at various rights and educational non-profits in the U.S., U.K., Indonesia, and Myanmar. Her interests include transitional justice, armed conflicts in Southeast Asia, and the role of civil society in democratic transitions.

Past Visiting Fellows

From 28 April-8 May 2014, Dr. Thomas Obel Hansen was a Visiting Research Fellow at the CHRC in connection to a British Academy-funded research project, headed by Professor Chandra Lekha Sriram, concerning "The role of civil society in promoting accountability for serious crimes in Kenya".  Thomas is currently employed as an assistant professor of international law with United States International University in Nairobi, Kenya. He holds a PhD in law from Aarhus University Law School in Denmark (2010). Thomas’ research focuses on transitional justice and international criminal law.

Despoina-Betty Kaklamanidou, Visiting Research Fellow 2012-2013 at the School of Law and Social Sciences at UEL. She has been teaching Film History and Theory at the Film Studies Department at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece since 2005. She is currently conducting research on how film can be used as teaching tool for the dissemination of good practices concerning citizenship issues.

Dr. Kalliopi Chainoglou, Research Fellow 2012-2013, Visiting Research Fellow 2014-2015. During her time with the centre Kalliopi worked on an interdisciplinary research project which brings together issues of media literacy, human rights awareness and the evolving concept of the European active citizenship.

Ellie Smith, Visiting Researcher 2011.  Ellie is an international human rights lawyer and researcher with 10 years of experience in the field of justice for survivors of torture, reparations and victims’ rights.

Dr. Ruth Abril Stoffels, Visiting Researcher, June-July 2011. Dr. Abril is Reader at the Universidad Cardenal Herrera CEU of Valencia. During her stay at the Centre Dr. Abril is conducting research on women and girls in peace-building operations. Her work on humanitarian assistance is internationally recognised and has won the Paul Reuter Award in 2003.

Dr. Elena Lopez-Almansa Beaus, Visiting Researcher, November-December 2009. During her stay at the CHRC Dr. Lopez Almansa Beaus conducted research on the illegal exploitation of natural resources in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Dr. Carmen Draghici, Leverhulme Visiting Fellow, January 2008-January 2009. During her stay at the Centre Dr. Draghici undertook the research project on 'The search for a fair balance between the imperative of national security and the protection of human rights in the recent caselaw of the European Courts concerning the ‘blacklists’ of alleged terrorists'. She also coordinated the organisation of the Interdisciplinary Research Seminar on Counterterrorism, Human Rights and International Legality which gathered perspectives from scholars, practitioners, human rights activists.

Research Groups and Activities

Research Groups

The CHRC conducts empirical studies and evaluations of policy and practice on various human rights issues.

Past Research Projects

The Centre has engaged in research in several important areas at the intersection of human rights and contemporary conflict. The research projects undertaken by the CHRC include work on the following list below:

Publications

CHRC Publications

  • Michael Phillips, "Walking on Water: Religion, Historical Memory and Human Rights in Spain and Australia", presented at Columbia University’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights conference “Local Memory, Global Ethics, Justice: The Politics of Historical Dialogue in Contemporary Society” , December 2012.

Publications of CHRC Members

Authored Books


Edited Books

  • Sriram, Chandra Lekha, ed. (2016) Transitional Justice in the Middle East and North Africa London and New York: Hurst and Oxford University Press.

Book Chapters

  •  “International rule of law? Ethics and impartiality of legal professionals,” in Vesselin Popovski, ed., Ethical Supports for Strengthening the International Rule of Law (Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 2014).

  •  “Sri Lanka: Atrocities, accountability, and the decline of the rule of law,” in Renėe Jeffery and Hunjoon Kim, eds., Transitional Justice in the Asia-Pacific (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).
  • “Liberal peacebuilding and transitional justice: What place for socioeconomic concerns?” in Dustin Sharp, ed., Justice and economic violence in transition (New York: Springer, 2013).
  • “Victims, excombatants, and communities: Irreconcilable demands or a dangerous convergence?” in Christoph Safferling and Thorsten Bonacker, eds., Victims of International Crimes: An Interdisciplinary Discourse (The Hague: TMC Asser Press, 2013).
  • “Tribunals, legacies, and local culture: Lessons from some African experiences with international criminal justice,”  in Tribunale. Literarische Darstellung und juridische Aufarbeitung von Kriegsverbrechen im globalen Kontext, Werner Gephart, Jürgen Brokoff, Andrea Schütte and Jan Christoph Suntrup,eds.,  (Frankfurt/Main: Klostermann, 2013).
  • “International vs. domestic norms and actors” and “Zone of Impunity” in Nadya Nedelsky and Lavinia Stan, eds., Encyclopedia of Transitional Justice (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).
  • “Transitional justice and peacebuilding in comparative perspective: Lessons for the Middle East,” in Hasan Al-Momani, Ruba Zinati, and Amani Da’na, eds., Advancing justice and reconciliation for long term peacebuilding in the Middle East (Amman: Regional Centre on Conflict Prevention, 2012).
  • “Beyond justice versus peace: Transitional justice and peacebuilding strategies,” with Olga Martin-Ortega and Johanna Herman, in Karin Aggestam and Annika Björkdahl, eds., The Study of Just and Durable Peace (London: Routledge, 2012).
  • Sriram, Chandra and Mills, Kurt (2010) 'Human Rights.' In: Denemark, Robert, (ed.), The International Studies Encyclopedia. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Sriram, Chandra and Herman, Johanna and Martin-Ortega, Olga (2010) 'War, Conflict, and Human Rights.' In: Denemark, Robert, (ed.), The ISA Compendium Project. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Sriram, Chandra (2009) 'Transitional Justice and the Liberal Peace.' In: Newman, Edward and Richmond, Oliver and Paris, Roland, (eds.), New Perspectives on Liberal Peacebuilding. New York: United Nations University Press.
Articles
  • "Fighting for justice (and survival): Kenyan civil society accountability strategies and their enemies" with Thomas Obel-Hansen, International Journal of Transitional Justice (November 2015).
  • Sriram, Chandra Lekha, (2013) 'Spoilers of justice', Nordic Journal of Human Rights,2, pp. 248-262.
  • Sriram, Chandra Lekha, (2013), 'Making rights real? Minority and gender provisions and power-sharing arrangements', International Journal of Human Rights, 17 (2), pp. 275-288.
Book Reviews
Other
  • Sriram, Chandra Lekha (2012) 'The Special Tribunal for Lebanon.' In: Reconciliation, Reform and Resilience: Positive Peace for Lebanon. Accord, 24 . London: Conciliation Resources.

Books
  • Partitioning Palestine: Legal Fundamentalism in the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (London and New York: Pluto Press, 2010).ISBN 978 0 7453 2323 7
  • (ed.) Law after Ground Zero (London, Sydney, Portland Or: GlassHouse Press/Routledge-Cavendish, 2002, reprinted with amendments, 2004) ISBN 978 1 904 385 028.

Edited Journals
  • (ed.) with Barry Collins, Iraq and Human Rights, International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, Vol. 5, No 3 (2011).ISSN17512867
  • (ed.) with Roshan de Silva Wijeyeratne, Tracking the Postcolonial in Law, Griffith Law Review, Vol. 12, No. 3 (2003) ISSN 1038-3441.

Essays
  • State-Sponsored Riot: Tales of Revolt and Crime in Egypt 2011, in Daniel Briggs (ed.) The English Riots of 2011:The Summer of Discontent (Hook: Waterside Press, 2012), 329-345.
  • (with Barry Collins) Iraq and Human Rights, International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, Vol. 5, No. 3 (2011), pp. 311-318.
  • Provoking International Law: War and Regime Change in Iraq, in  Sundhya Pahuja, Fleur Johns, and Richard Joyce (eds.) Events - The Force of International Law (Routledge-Cavendish, 2011), pp. 246-259.
  • Britain’s Democratic Vision for Iraq: Strategy or Contingency? International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies Vol. 2, No 3 (2008), pp. 351-374.
  • Islam and the Politics of Terrorism: Aspects of the British Experience, in Miriam Gani and Penelope Mathew (eds.) Fresh Perspectives on the War on Terror (Canberra: ANU E Press, 2008), pp. 9-26.
  • British (and International) Legal Foundations for the Israeli Wall: International Law and Multi-colonialism, Palestine Yearbook of International Law, vol. 13 (2007), pp. 1-26.
  • Conjuring Palestine: The Jurisdiction of Dispossession in Shaun McVeigh (ed.) Jurisprudence of Jurisdiction (Abingdon and New York: Routledge-Cavendish, 2007), pp. 84-101
  • On the Trail of the Palestinian State, in Jacqueline S Ismael and William W Haddad and Jacqueline Ismael (eds.) Barriers to Reconciliation: Case Studies from Iraq and the Palestine-Israeli Conflict (Lanham,  Boulder, New York, Toronto, Oxford: University Press of America 2007), pp. 195-227.
  • Zionism and Apartheid: the analogy in the politics of international law, Engage Journal No 2, (May  2006)
  • Two Peoples, One State? review essay, Virginia Tilley, The One State Solution: A Breakthrough for the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock, Democratiya, Issue, 4, March-May 2006, pp. 34-48.
  • The International Community’s legal responses to Apartheid South Africa and the Israeli Occupation of the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem, Avocats sans Frontieres, December 2005
  • Revisiting Islamic Law: Marginal Notes from Colonial History, Griffith Law Review Vol. 12, No.2 (2003), pp/ 362-383.
  • (with Roshan de Silva Wijeyeratne) Tracks and Traces of the Law, Griffith Law Review, Vol.12, No.2 (2003), pp. 157-165.
  • Holy War: in the Media: Images of Jihad, in Steven Chermak, Frankie Y. Bailey and Michelle Brown (eds.) Media Representations of September 11 (Westport CT. and London:: Praeger, 2003), pp.17-28.
  • Islamic Law and the English Press in John Strawson (ed.) Law after Ground Zero (London, Sydney, Portland Or: Glasshouse Press, 2002), pp. 205-214.
  • (with Kim van der Borght) Cuba and the Axis of Evil: An Old Outlaw in the New Order in John Strawson (ed.) Law after Ground Zero (London, Sydney, Portland Or: Glasshouse Press, 2002), pp. 59-70.
  • In the Name of the Law, in John Strawson (ed.) Law after Ground Zero (London, Sydney, and Portland Or: GlassHouse Press, 2002), pp. xi-xxii.
  • Reflections on Edward Said and the Legal Narratives of Palestine: Israeli Settlements and Palestinian Self-Determination, Penn State International Law Review, Vol. 20, No 2 (2002), pp. 363-384.
  • “Mandate Ways: Self-Determination in Palestine and the ‘Existing Non-Jewish Communities,’” in Sanford R. Silverburg (Ed.) Palestine and International Law: Essays on Politics and Economics (Jefferson N.C and London: McFarland, 2002), pp. 251-270.
  • “Orientalism and Legal Education in the Middle East: Reading Frederic Goadby’s Introduction to the Study of Law,” Legal Studies Vol. 21 No. 4 (2001), pp. 664-678.
  • “Britain’s Shadows: Post-colonialism and Palestine” in Tareq Y. Ismael (Ed.) The International Relations of the Middle East in the 21st Century (Aldershot and Burlington: Ashgate, 2000), pp. 203-225.
  • “Islamic Law and English Texts” in Eve Darian-Smith and Peter Fitzpatrick (Eds.), Laws of the Postcolonial (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999), pp. 109-126.
  • “Legal Story Telling After Diana and Dodi: The Disappeared of the Postcolonial” in Mehmet Tahiroglu, Tareq Y. Ismael and Jacqueline S. Ismael (Eds.) Globalization in World Affairs: Socio-Economic and Political Dimensions (Gazimagusa: Eastern Mediterranean University Press, 1999), pp. 311-328.
  • “Palestine’s Basic Law: Constituting New Identities Through Liberating Legal Culture,” Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Journal, Vol. 20, No.3 (1998), pp. 411-432.
  • “Netanyahu’s Oslo: Peace in the Slow Lane,” Soundings, Issue 8 (1998) pp. 49-60.
  • “A Western Question to the Middle East: Is There a Human Rights Discourse in Islam?”” Arab Studies Quarterly, Vol. 19, No. 1 (1997), pp. 31-58.
  • “Encountering Islamic Law,” School of Law Research Publications: University of East London, New Series No. 1 (1996) [41 pages] simultaneously published electronically by UEL, and subsequently by the International Islamic University at http://www.iiu.edu.my/deed/lawbase/jsrps.html (2000).
  • “Islamic Law and English Texts,” Law and Critique Vol. V, No. 1 (1995), pp. 21-38.
  • The Kuwait Crisis: Self-Determination, Self-Defence and the New Global Order, University of East London: School of Law Research Papers, No 4 (1992), pp. 1-17.


Book Reviews and Shorter Articles
  • Palestine: the pursuit of justice (interview with Rosemary Bechler) openDemocracy, January 28, 2008.
  • Book Review: Gina Clayton, Textbook on Immigration and Asylum Law, Times Higher Educational Supplement,  February 10 2006.
  • Book Review: C.G. Weeramantry, Universalising International Law, Melbourne Journal of International Law, Vol.5, No. 2 (2004), pp. 513-518.
  • Book Review: Robert Winder, Bloody Foreigners: The Story of Immigration to Britain, Times Higher Education Supplement, December 24/31, 2004.
  • Book Review: Sami Zubaida, Law and Power in the Islamic World, Modern Law Review, Vol. 67, N0.5 (2004), pp. 879-881.
  • Book Review: Dallal Stevens, UK Asylum Law and Policy: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, Times Higher Education Supplement, May 28 2004.
  • The Israeli Wall, Palestine and the International Court of Justice, Student Law Review, Vol. 42 (2004), pp. 48-50.
  • Guantananamo Bay Prisoners: The Third Geneva Convention and the “War on Terror.” Student Law Review. Vol. 41 (2004), pp. 44-45.
  • Book Review: Frederic M. Goadby and Moses Doukhan, The Land Law of Palestine, Palestine Yearbook of International Law Vol.11 (2003), pp. 399-401.
  • Occupying Iraq – Regime Change and International Law, Student Law Review, Vol. 40 (2003), pp. 44-45.
  • Book Review: Javaid Rehman, International Human Rights: A Practical Approach; Rhona K. Smith, Textbook on International Human Rights, Times Higher Educational Supplement, May 30 2003.
  • For a World at War – An International Criminal Court, Student Law Review, Vol. 39 (2003), pp.44-45.
  • In the Name of the Law? Socialist Lawyer, Vol. 35 (Spring 2003), pp. 14-15.
  • The United Nations and the use of force: unilateralism and the international rule of law, Student Law Review, Vol. 38 (2003), pp. 50-51.
  • Book Review: Basia Spalek (ed.) Islam, Crime and Criminal Justice, British Society of Criminology Newsletter, No. 48, March 2003, p.17.
  • Iraq: A Threat to International Peace and Security? Student Law Review, Vol. 37 (2002) pp. 49-50.
  • The Middle East Crisis: International law and the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, Student Law Review, Vol. 36 (2002), pp. 50-52.
  • Terrorism: Has Law Had a Good War? Student Law Review, Vol. 35 (2002), pp. 50-51.
  • Book Review: Lawrence Rosen, The Justice of Islam, Journal of Law and Society Vol.28, No.4 (2001), pp. 628-632.
  • International Law at Ground Zero, Student Law Review, Vol. 34 (2001), 52.
  • Book Review: Keith Ansell Pearson, Benita Parry and Judith Squires, Cultural Readings of Imperialism: Edward Said and the Gravity of History, Socialist History Journal, Issue 14 (1999), pp. 68-70.
  • Book Review: Paul J.I. M. de Waart, Dynamics of Self-Determination in Palestine, Islamic Law and Society Vol. 2, No 3 (1995), pp. 362-363.
Books


Book Chapters

  • With Olga Martin-Ortega, “Hybrid Tribunals: interaction and resistance in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Cambodia” in Oliver Richmond and Audra Mitchell (eds), Hybrid Forms of Peace: From the ‘Everyday’ to Post-liberalism (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2011).
  • With Olga Martin-Ortega, “Narrowing Gaps in Justice: Exploring Rule of Law Programming in Liberia” in Chandra Lekha Sriram, Olga Martin-Ortega and Johanna Herman, (eds.)., Peacebuilding and rule of law in Africa: Just Peace? (Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2011).
  • With Olga Martin-Ortega, “The impact of hybrid tribunals: Current practice in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Cambodia”, in Michael Reed and Amanda Lyons (eds.), Contested Transitions: Dilemmas of Transitional Justice in Colombia and Comparative Experience (Bogota: International Center for Transitional Justice, 2010).

Articles

  • Realities of victim participation: The civil party system in practice at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), Contemporary Justice Review, Vol. 16, Iss. 4, (November 2013).

Handbooks/Policy Papers

  • "Managing Diversity: Culture", Conflict Prevention Handbook Series, No. 5, Initiative on Quiet Diplomacy, forthcoming 2016.
  • "Quick Guide to Managing Diversity: Culture", forthcoming 2016.
  • "Land and Conflict Prevention" (co-author with John Bruce), Conflict Prevention Handbook Series, No. 6, Initiative on Quiet Diplomacy, 2011.
  • "Quick Guide to Land and Conflict Prevention", 2011.

Book Chapters

  • “The Role of Soft Law in Minority Rights Protection and Diversity Management: Reflections from Practice” (with Zdenka Machnyikova and John Packer), in: Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen and Stephanie Lagoutte (eds.), The roles of Soft Law in International Human Rights Law, Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2016.
  • The Role of Human Rights in Diversity Management and Conflict Prevention”, in: Corinne Lennox (ed.), Contemporary Challenges in Securing Human Rights, London: Human Rights Consortium/Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2015, pp. 59-66
  • “Overview of Minority-related Activities in the UN system in 2013” (with Rajiv Jebodh and Jeremie Gilbert), in: European Yearbook of Minority Issues Volume 12, 2013/2014 Netherlands: Koninklijke Brill, 2015
  • "Culture for Shared Societies" (co-author with Zdenka Machnyikova), in: Mari Fitzduff (ed.), Public Policies in Shared Societies: A Comparative Approach, Palgrave, 2013, pp. 167-214.
  • "Land and Conflict in Shared Societies" (with John Bruce), in: Mari Fitzduff (ed.), in: Mari Fitzduff (ed.), Public Policies in Shared Societies: A Comparative Approach, Palgrave, 2013, pp. 215-240.
  • "OSCE Developments and Linguistic Minorities" (with John Packer), in: Matthias Koenig & Paul de Guchteneire (eds.), Democracy and Human Rights in Multicultural Societies, Ashgate/UNESCO, 2007, pp. 107-132.
  • "Family, Private Life and Cultural Rights", in: Marc Weller and Alcidia Moucheboeuf (eds.), Universal Minority Rights: A Commentary on the Jurisprudence of International Courts and Treaty Bodies, European Centre for Minority Issues (ECMI) & Centre of International Studies, Oxford University Press, 2007, pp. 203-252.
  • "Commentary on Article 9", (with John Packer), in: ECMI (ed.), Advancing the Efficiency of the Global Structures of Minority Rights Protection on the Basis of the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, Oxford University Press, 2005, pp. 256-291.
  • "The Activities of the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities, June 2003–May 2004", in: ECMI & European Academy Bolzano (eds.), European Yearbook of Minority Issues, Volume 3, 2003/4, Netherlands: Koninklijke Brill, 2004, pp. 429–456.
  • "The Activities of the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities, January 2001–May 2002", in:  European Yearbook of Minority Issues, Volume 1, 2001/2, London: Kluwer Law International, 2003, pp. 563-589.

Articles

  • "The Lund Recommendations in the Activities of the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities", in: Krzysztof Drzewicki (ed.), International Journal of Minority and Group Rights,  Vol. 12, No. 2-3, 2005, pp. 169-188.
  • "Proceedings of the Conference on the Use of Minority Languages in the Broadcast Media, Baden bei Wein, 24-25 October 2003", (contributor and guest editor with John Packer), Special Issue of Mercator Media Forum, University of Wales Press, 2004.
  • "The Use of Minority Languages in the Broadcast Media: Introducing New Guidelines", (co-author with John Packer), in: Helsinki Monitor, 2004, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 103-126.

Web articles


External Activities and Impact

CHRC members undertake a wide range of consultancies for international organisations and NGOs. They also lead trainings and workshops on a number of topics related to the work of the centre.

Acceptance of international criminal justice

On 3-4 September 2015, Chandra Lekha Sriram acted as a trainer at the Nuremberg Principles Academy in Germany as part of their programme on “Acceptance of international criminal justice.”  Working with a group of early-career scholars and practitioners from conflict-affected countries, she elaborated on the challenges of pursuing peace and justice, focusing on legal, political and technical challenges.

Europeaid funded project: YOUTHTOPIA!

Mertkan Hamit, a PhD student at the CHRC, is leading this project to be delivered through the Famagusta Youth Center (MAGEM) in northern Cyprus in cooperation with partners in the south, Youth Power. The aim is to raise awareness and empower young people to get involved in the reconciliation process and address the human rights concerns of vulnerable youth at local and municipal levels and ultimately across the Island.  As part of the project, CHRC will deliver a series of workshops on human rights and conflict resolution (CR) for vulnerable youth from the Greek and Turkish Cypriot communities. Workshop participants will subsequently have the opportunity to apply for small grants to fund their own CR and human rights-related projects. CHRC will also provide capacity-building training for MAGEM and Youth Power.

Minority Rights Groups International (MRG)

Sally Holt and Jeremie Gilbert have been commissioned by MRG to prepare an e-learning course for the UN Staff System College on “Participation and Inclusion of Minorities in UN and National Programming”. 

European Commission External Action Service

In July 2013 Sally Holt participated in an Expert Mission to the Russian Federation under the Visa Dialogue process to assess compliance with relevant international standards and recommendations in the areas of anti-discrimination, protection of minorities, and combat against hate crimes. The consolidated report and recommendations are available here

UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)

Sally Holt has authored an e-learning module on “Addressing Disputes and Conflicts over the Tenure of Natural Resources” in support of the implementation of UN FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure.

UN Office of the Special Adviser to the Secretary General Yemen (OSASG)

In May 2013 Sally Holt prepared a background paper on “Restitution of Land and Property” to inform the National Dialogue Process in Yemen.  

Initiative on Quiet Diplomacy, Human Rights Internet

Sally Holt developed a ‘Quick Guide’ version of a handbook on “Land and Conflict Prevention” co-authored with John Bruce.

Please direct any queries to the Director of the Centre on Human Rights in Conflict

Chandra Lekha Sriram
Professor of International Law and International Relations
Director, Centre on Human Rights in Conflict 
University of East London
University Square
London E15 1NF
+44 20 8223 2189
c.sriram@uel.ac.uk