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Volume 5, No. 2

2019

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Editorial

Cite as:
Thomas, M. (2019). Editorial. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Dr Miles Thomas
School of Psychology, University of East London, London, England

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Articles

Abstract

According to the Professional Practice Guidelines for Educational Psychologists (EPs), psychological assessment in education is a continuous process, aiming to improve effective and inclusive education for children and young people (CYP) (British Psychological Society [BPS], 2002). Within this process, information about CYP can be gathered through consultation; curriculum-based assessment; psychometric and dynamic assessment; measures of social, emotional and mental health (SEMH); and observation. Regarding observation specifically, it can be considered that this method of information gathering is frequently used not only by EPs but also by special education teachers, teacher trainers and Ofsted, regarding quality of learning, teaching, and interventions (Bowles et al., 2016). In this sense, it may become necessary for EPs to be mindful of their role in, and purpose for, conducting observations within the process of assessment, not just watching behaviour but formulating and testing hypotheses about why behaviours occur (Hughes & Dexter, 2011). Additionally, while EPs’ frequent use of observations could be considered positive due to various advantages (Tilstone, 2012), it’s prevalence within the profession also makes it necessary to consider and be aware of any potential limitations. This paper will, therefore, evaluate the use of observations within the process of psychological assessment, particularly regarding the legal, ethical and moral principles of EP practice; different observation techniques and related psychological frameworks; and the potential impact of individual differences between professionals.

Cite as:

Speed, E. (2019). The process of psychological assessment: A critique of non-participatory observations within educational psychology practice and the process of psychological assessment. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1–8. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Dr Emma Speed
Norfolk County Council, Norfolk, England

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Abstract

Several professional frameworks have been developed that provide mechanisms to support the application of psychology to problem-solving; thus facilitating the role of educational psychologists as scientist–practitioners. Furthermore, existing frameworks do not have to be viewed in isolation and can be integrated to demonstrate effective and defensible professional standards (Kelly & Marks Woolfson, 2017). This paper is a reflection on practice written by a third-year trainee from Manchester University. It aims to critique five existing frameworks, through casework analysis, and critically synthesise findings to produce a personalised framework based on “what works”. A theoretical model, “The Model of Dynamic Epistemology” (MODE) and a framework to support the application of MODE has been suggested. The paper concludes that an effective professional framework must emphasise positive relationships and shared understanding while maintaining scientific rigour. Finally, limitations have been outlined and future action research into the effect of MODE recommended.

Several professional frameworks have been developed that provide mechanisms to support the application of psychology to problem-solving; thus facilitating the role of educational psychologists as scientist–practitioners. Furthermore, existing frameworks do not have to be viewed in isolation and can be integrated to demonstrate effective and defensible professional standards (Kelly & Marks Woolfson, 2017). This paper is a reflection on practice written by a third-year trainee from Manchester University. It aims to critique five existing frameworks, through casework analysis, and critically synthesise findings to produce a personalised framework based on “what works”. A theoretical model, “The Model of Dynamic Epistemology” (MODE) and a framework to support the application of MODE has been suggested. The paper concludes that an effective professional framework must emphasise positive relationships and shared understanding while maintaining scientific rigour. Finally, limitations have been outlined and future action research into the effect of MODE recommended.

Cite as:

Sedgwick, A. (2019). Educational psychologists as scientist practitioners: A critical synthesis of existing professional frameworks by a consciously incompetent trainee. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1–19. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Dr Adrienne Sedgwick
Bradford Local Authority, Bradford, England

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Abstract

This paper draws on the personal experiences of developing and carrying out an individual and group therapeutic intervention. It will reflect on the factors that impacted psychological formulation throughout the intervention process. The paper will draw on how psychological theories such as Bion’s (1961) theory of group processes and systemic thinking, can be used to understand unconscious processes in groups and the complexity of formulation. The aim is to provide insight into unconscious processes within groups and reflect on how the voice of the child can be promoted through therapeutic interventions. As the paper reflects on personal experience, it will conclude with some implications for educational psychology practice.

Cite as:

Ng, R. (2019). Developing therapeutic interventions in EP practice: Reflections on unconscious processes and promoting the child’s voice. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1–10. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Dr Rosabel Ng
Lewisham Specialist Teachers Educational Psychology Service, London, England

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Abstract

Understanding around school refusal behaviour has significantly changed over time, from beliefs that it stemmed from a phobia, to more recent views that the behaviour serves a function for the child or young person. These changes run in parallel to a dominant medicalised and within-child view of school refusal, which has subsequently impacted on the interventions used by professionals. This article looks at the evidence base around the most commonly used intervention, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) (Maynard et al., 2018), to determine whether its extensive use is validated. The use of this intervention in educational psychology practice is explored, with consideration for the merits of finding a “gold standard” intervention in comparison to adopting a more individualised approach. To support a more individualised and systemic approach, Nuttall and Woods’ (2013) “Ecological Model of Successful Reintegration” is explored in relation to educational psychology practice.

Cite as:

Lee, H. (2019). The use of cognitive behavioural therapy for school refusal behaviour in educational psychology practice. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1–13. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Harriet Lee
University of East London, London, England

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Abstract

The Thrive approach is an assessment and planning based intervention that aims to develop children’s social and emotional wellbeing. Despite the increased popularity of Thrive, there is limited research that has investigated its effectiveness. After reviewing the assessment, training and intervention elements of Thrive and the evidence base for the underpinning assumptions, this article considers the evaluative research. Thrive is rooted in attachment theory and assumes that infant development is vulnerable to disruption by poor attachment experiences and that these disruptions can be ameliorated in later life through the development of secure relationships with school staff. The article concludes that, while Thrive is based on attachment theory, which itself is well supported by evidence, how Thrive applies and interprets this theory is less well supported. There is currently limited evidence of the impact of Thrive on children’s development. Other issues and implications of this critique are also discussed.

This research was completed as part of the Doctorate in Educational Psychology at University of Southampton.

Cite as:

Gibby-Leversuch, R., Field, J., & Cooke, T. (2019). To what extent is the thrive intervention grounded in research and theory? Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1–8. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Dr Rosa Gibby-Leversuch
West Sussex Educational Psychology Service, West Sussex, England

Jasmine Field
Portsmouth City Council, Portsmouth, England

Dr Tim Cooke
University of Southampton, Southampton, England

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Book Reviews

Cite as:
Bray, D.. (2019). [Review of the book The psychology of effective studying: How to succeed in your degree, by P. Penn]. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(2), 1. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-2-2019

Dr Diane Bray
Solent University, Southampton, England

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