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Volume 5, No. 1

2019

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Editorial

Cite as:
Thomas, M. (2019). Editorial. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Dr Miles Thomas
School of Psychology, University of East London, England

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Articles

Abstract

This article has two aims: to introduce participatory research approaches with children and young people, and to consider such approaches within educational psychology training, practice and research. A range of ways of conceptualising and approaching participatory research is explored. Models applied to researching with children and young people specifically are then explained. A critical analysis of participatory research methods is offered, outlining power-related criticisms, ethical considerations and practical issues.

The focus then turns to educational psychology, looking at applications of such approaches in researching with children and young people, the group that educational psychologists (EPs) work with predominantly. It is proposed that participatory research methods are highly relevant to the profession, both in the training of EPs and for practising psychologists. This is set in the context of the Doctorate in Educational and Child Psychology at the University of East London. It is suggested that educational psychology research should take an increasingly participatory focus.

Keywords: participatory research, educational psychology, children as researchers, co-researchers, young researchers, participation

Cite as:
Wallace, F., & Giles, P. (2019). Participatory research approaches in educational psychology training and practice. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1–9. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Felicity Wallace and Dr Pandora Giles
University of East London, London, England

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Abstract

Within the context of changes to the model of service delivery of Educational Psychology Services in the United Kingdom (Lee & Woods, 2017), the purpose of the current review was to explore the contribution of paraprofessionals within psychological services. A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses framework (Moher, Liberati, Tetzlaff, Altman, & The PRISMA Group, 2009) was used to search, screen and identify research relevant to psychology paraprofessionals. Following exploration through relevant databases, seven studies met the criteria for inclusion in the current review. The findings outlined the contribution of assistant psychologists in the UK and the potential wide remit of the role was uncovered, including contributions at a service level and direct work with service users. Key features to facilitate the successful deployment of assistants were highlighted. The association between employment as an assistant psychologist and subsequent progression into professional training was also revealed.

Keywords: paraprofessionals, assistant psychologist, contribution, educational psychology, clinical psychology

Cite as:
Woodley-Hume, T., Woods, K. (2019). The contribution of assistant psychologists in the UK. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1–12. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Tracey Woodley-Hume and Professor Kevin Woods
University of Manchester, Manchester, England

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Abstract

Conducting culturally and linguistically fair assessments is an ethical requirement for educational psychologists, particularly when working with children and young people with English as an additional language (EAL). Despite a number of existing professional guidelines and frameworks for practice, the evidence base on how to address cultural and linguistic bias when working with this population is still limited, especially in the UK context. Findings from an interview with three experienced educational psychologists highlight an increased awareness around this issue and the need for further studies and guidance on non-discriminatory assessment practice for children and young people with EAL.

Keywords: cognitive assessment, English as an additional language, children and young people, educational psychology

Cite as:
Zaniolo, A. (2019). A critical evaluation of EPs’ cognitive assessment work with children and young people with English as an additional language. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 14–16. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Alice Zaniolo
University of East London, London, England

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Abstract

In England, the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) curriculum (ages 0 to 5) emphasises the use of a play-based approach, focusing on the needs, interests and developmental stages of children. Dynamic assessment (DA) represents an opportunity for educational psychologists (EPs) (Hill, 2015) to utilise a play-based approach for assessing the functional behaviour of children who find it difficult to engage with formal and static testing situations (Tzuriel, 2000). However, it is one of the least utilised methods in EP practice (Hill, 2015).

Using systematic literature review methodology and research quality assessment frameworks, this paper examines the usefulness of DA with children in the EYFS. The review indicated mixed results for the usefulness of DA. DA added value to static assessments for cognitive and linguistic functioning, reduced the risk of biased assessment and contributed predictive information about later independence. Future research should explore EPs’ use of DA in the EYFS.

Keywords: early years, educational psychologists, dynamic assessment

Cite as:
Hussain, S., Woods, K., & Williams, C. (2019). Use of dynamic assessment with children in the early years foundation stage: A review of the literature. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1–14. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Dr Sobia Hussain
Blackpool Council, Blackpool, England

Professor Kevin Woods
University of Manchester, Manchester, England

Christine Williams
Bolton SICT, Bolton, England

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Abstract

This paper offers reflections on teachers using solution-focused approaches in schools, supported by Educational Psychologists (EPs). The paper provides an outline of the development of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT), its assumptions and its limitations. Literature describing its application in schools by teachers and the evidence of its effectiveness is reviewed using a Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. A discussion about the appropriateness of this tool is also examined, leading to further discussion relating to evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence. The paper concludes that it is very difficult for EPs to judge the strength of the evidence base for solution-focused approaches since this judgement is affected by the epistemological position a person takes.

Keywords: Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT), teachers, schools, Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP), evidence-based practice (EBP)

Cite as:
Simmonds, S. (2019). A critical review of teachers using solution-focused approaches supported by educational psychologists. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1–8. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Sam Simmonds
University of East London, London, England

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Book Reviews

Cite as:
Leonard, M. (2019). [Review of the book Children's experiences of classrooms: Talking about being pupils in the classroom, by E. Hargreaves]. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Matthew Leonard
University of East London, London, England

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Resources

Cite as:
Greene, J. (2019). Apps for EPs and mental health professionals. Educational psychology research and practice, 5(1), 1–5. Available at: https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/educational-psychology-research-and-practice/volume-5-no-1-2019

Dr Jennifer Greene
Singapore

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