Dr Tim Lomas

Contact details

Position: Lecturer

Location: Stratford Campus, Room: AE.3.29

Telephone: 020 8223 4465

Contact address:

School of Psychology
The University of East London
Stratford Campus
Water Lane
London
E15 4LZ

Brief biography

Tim joined the University of East London in 2013 as a lecturer on the MSc in Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP). Tim undertook his PhD at the University of Westminster, funded by the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, which he completed in 2012. His research explored the impact of meditation on men’s wellbeing, using a mixed-methods design comprising narrative interviews, cognitive testing, and EEG measurement.

Tim has recently published two books: one is a monograph based on his PhD thesis, entitled Masculinity, Meditation and Mental Health (2014, Palgrave Macmillan); the other is a textbook based on Tim’s redesign of the MAPP double module in Advanced Positive Psychology, entitled Applied Positive Psychology: Integrated Positive Practice (2014, Sage). Tim has recently been awarded two grants to design mindfulness-based interventions, adapted for specific populations (at-risk adolescent males, and older adults). Tim’s main research interests are meditation and Buddhism.

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Activities and responsibilities

  • Lecturer and Deputy Programme Leader on the MSc in Applied Positive Psychology

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Areas of Interest/Summary of Expertise

  • Meditation
  • Religion/spirituality
  • Gender
  • Cognitive neuroscience
  • Integral theory
  • Multidimensional approaches to wellbeing

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Teaching: Programmes

  • MSc Applied Positive Psychology

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Teaching: Modules

  • PY7710: Advanced Positive Psychology: Theory and Practice

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Current research and publications

Publically available research outputs are available to download from UEL’s Research Open Access Repository (ROAR).

Grants

  1. Lomas, T. (2014). Development of a mindfulness-based intervention for at-risk adolescent males. £9,384, awarded by the Richard Benjamin Memorial Trust.
  2. Lomas, T. (2014). Mindful wellbeing for older adults: Designing, implementing and assessing a pilot intervention. £9,820, awarded by the University of East London Early Career Researcher Accelerator Fund.

Peer-reviewed Journal Articles

  1. Lomas, T., Edginton, T., Cartwright, T., & Ridge, D. (2015). Cultivating equanimity through mindfulness meditation: A mixed methods enquiry into the development of decentring capabilities. International Journal of Wellbeing, 5(3), 88–106.
  2. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2015). A qualitative analysis of experiential challenges associated with meditation practice. Mindfulness, 6(4), 848–860. doi:10.1007/s12671-014-0329-8
  3. Lomas, T., & Ivtzan, I. (2015). Second wave positive psychology: Exploring the positive-negative dialectics of wellbeing. Journal of Happiness Studies. doi:10.1007/s10902-015-9668-y
  4. Lomas, T. (2015). Positive social psychology: A multilevel inquiry into socio-cultural wellbeing initiatives. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law. doi:10.1037/law0000051
  5. Brani, O., Hefferon, K., Lomas, T., Ivtzan, I., & Painter, J. (2014). The impact of body awareness on subjective wellbeing: The role of mindfulness. International Journal of Body Psychotherapy, 13(1), 94–107.
  6. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2014). Engagement with meditation as a positive health trajectory: Divergent narratives of progress in male meditators. Psychology and Health, 29(2), 218–236. doi:10.1080/08870446.2013.843684
  7. Lomas, T., Edginton, T., Cartwright, T., & Ridge, D. (2014). Men developing emotional intelligence through meditation? Combining narrative, cognitive, and EEG findings. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 15(2), 213–224. doi:10.1037/a0032191
  8. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2014). A religion of wellbeing?: The appeal of Buddhism to men in London, UK. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 6(3), 198–207. doi:10.1037/a0036420
  9. Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2014). The LIFE model: A meta-theoretical conceptual map for applied positive psychology. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1–18. doi:10.1007/s10902-014-9563-y
  10. Lomas, T. (2014). Exploring the impact of meditation on men’s mental health: Combining narrative analysis and cognitive neuroscience assessment. SAGE Cases in Methodology. doi:10.4135/978144627305013496526
  11. Surana, P.K., & Lomas, T. (2014). The power of charity: Does giving away money improve the wellbeing of the donor? Indian Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(3), 223–230.
  12. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2013). ‘I was so done in that I just recognized it very plainly, “You need to do something”’: Men’s narratives of struggle, distress and turning to meditation. Health, 17(2), 191–208. doi:10.1177/1363459312451178
  13. Lomas, T. (2013). Critical positive masculinity. Masculinties and Social Change, 2(2), 167–193. doi:10.4471/MCS.2013.28

Books

  1. Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2014). Applied positive psychology: Integrated positive practice. London: Sage.
  2. Lomas, T. (2014). Masculinity, meditation, and mental health. London: Palgrave MacMillan.

Conference Papers

  1. Worth, P., Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2014, July). Embracing the dark side of life with positive psychology. Workshop presented at the 7th European conference on positive psychology, Amsterdam.
  2. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2011). Men behaving well?: Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. Paper presented at the 7th Biennial Conference of the International Society of Critical Health Psychology, Adelaide, Australia.
  3. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2011). Men behaving well?: Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. Paper presented at the BSA Medical Sociology 2011 Annual Conference, Chester, UK.

Poster Sessions

  1. Worth, P., Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2014, July). Embracing the dark side of life with positive psychology. Poster session presented at the 7th European conference on positive psychology, Amsterdam.
  2. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2010). Men behaving well?: Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. Poster session presented at the Seminar Day on Men’s Health Behaviour, University of Sussex, UK.
  3. Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T., & Ridge, D. (2010). Men behaving well?: Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. Poster session presented at the 24th European Health Psychology Conference, Translyvania, Romania.

Invited Talks

  1. Lomas, T. (2014, May). An introduction to positive psychology. Presented at Kings College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.
  2. Lomas, T. (2014, March). The LIFE model in business. Presented at the Euregio Positive Psychology Seminar, Aarchen, Netherlands.
  3. Lomas, T., & Hefferon, K. (2014, February). Using positive psychology interventions in the context of unemployment. Presentation and training given to Learn Direct. Hatfield, Hartfordshire.

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Abstracts

  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

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Abstracts

The LIFE model — A meta-theoretical conceptual map for applied positive psychology

Lomas, T., Hefferon, K., & Ivtzan, I. (2014).

Since its emergence in 1998, positive psychology has flourished. Among its successes is the burgeoning field of applied positive psychology (APP), involving interventions to promote wellbeing. However, the remit of APP is currently unclear. As such, we offer a meta-theoretical conceptual map delineating the terrain that APP might conceivably cover, namely, the LIFE (Layered Integrated Framework Example) model. The model is based on Wilber’s (1997) Integral Framework, which features the four main ontological ‘dimensions’ of the person. We then stratify these dimensions to produce a comprehensive conceptual map of the person, and of the potential areas of application for APP. For example, we deconstruct the collective dimensions of Wilber’s framework using the levels of Bronfenbrenner’s (1977) experimental ecology. The result is a detailed multidimensional framework which facilitates a comprehensive approach to promoting wellbeing, and which charts a way forward for APP.

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