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UBEL Doctoral Training Partnership Pathways

Pathways

UEL contributes 1+3 (through the Masters in Heritage Studies, from 2018) and +3 training routes to this pathway, as well as other supervision and training. Contact: Toby Butler.

Pathway overview


Pathway Leader: 

Caroline Goodson

Team members: 
Jen Baird
Beverley Butler 
Toby Butler 
Kalliopi Fouseki 

Description:
Bloomsbury houses institutions recognised internationally for excellent research in archaeological and heritage disciplines and proven excellence at teaching and fostering research in the subjects. Students can approach this funded pathway through 6 training routes, depending on the nature of their research interests and training needs: Archaeological Practice, Cultural Heritage Studies, Heritage Studies, Public Archaeology, Heritage Science and Sustainable Heritage. Students can undertake study either part-time, or full-time, and can enter the doctoral programme either via a 1-year Masters or directly into a PhD. Each of these routes builds on the concentration of academic resources between partnering institutions, including the Institute of Archaeology, Institute for Sustainable Heritage, Raphael Samuel History Centre, and partnerships with the British Museum and Museum of London. Students will carry out cutting-edge research through our active archaeological and heritage field projects both in the UK and across the globe, and will develop their skills through teaching provision across our programme in central London. Interested students should approach relevant possible supervisors at any of our partner institutions to discuss their proposed research projects in the first instance; alternatively, interested students should contact a representative within the relevant department: Birkbeck: Dr Caroline Goodson; UCL, Institute of Archaeology: Miss Lisa Daniel; UCL, Centre for Sustainable Heritage: Dr Kalliopi Fouseki; UEL, Dr Toby Butler

View staff supervision interests for the Archaeology and Heritage Studies pathway.

UEL contributes supervision and training to this pathway. Contact: Kate Hodgkin k.hodgkin@uel.ac.uk. 

Pathway overview


Pathway Leaders: 

Thom Rath 
Jessica Reinisch 

Team members: 
Jonathan Bell 
Kate Hodgkin 
Kate Quinn

Description:
Economic and Social History in the consortium is based primarily within the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck and the Department of History and the Institute of the Americas at UCL. Together they are amongst the most prestigious centres of historical research in the United Kingdom with long-established and world leading reputations for scholarship across the broad range of the discipline. Additional expertise is provided by UEL, which means that there is extensive supervisory capacity and many opportunities for joint supervision, training and research collaboration. History at both Birkbeck and UCL spans time and space - from prehistory to the 21st century, from London to India and China, and from the history of ideas to the history of things. Established strengths include the study of Britain and its empire; medieval, early modern and modern Europe; the Americas; and comparative and transnational history. The breadth of research is matched by a shared focus on key areas of historical enquiry such as the relationship between society, the economy and power, state formation and emergent fields of growing importance such as educational history, healthcare, gender history, environmental history and the study of technology and material and consumer culture. All training routes are available in full-time and part-time modes, to fit the varied backgrounds and professional commitments of students. There are two modes of entry either via a 1 year Masters (1+3) or directly on to a PhD (+3). The Birkbeck-based route is available to both 1+3 and +3 students. The UCL Route is offered to +3 structures and UEL will provide +3 supervision in additional specialist areas. Potential applicants should apply first to the department of their choice (by 1 December 2016) using the normal application procedure. They are encouraged to contact possible supervisors at our partner institutions or pathway leads: Birkbeck: Dr Jessica Reinisch; UCL: Dr Thom Rath; UEL: Dr Kate Hodgkin

View staff supervision interests for the Economic and Social History pathway.

UEL contributes a  +3 training routes to this pathway, as well as providing other supervision and training. Contact: Stephen Maddison

Pathway overview


Pathway Leader: 
Rosie Cox

Team members: 

Description:
Gender and Sexuality research in the UCL, Bloomsbury and East London DTP is vibrant and diverse. It is characterised by interdisciplinarity and the innovative use of mixed methods.  Expertise within the DTP is provided in the areas of gender and: international development (Birkbeck, SOAS, UCL, UEL); psychosocial studies and sociology (Birkbeck, UCL, UEL); law (Birkbeck, SOAS); media and cultural studies (Birkbeck, SOAS, UCL, UEL); sexuality and history (Birkbeck, UCL, UEL); and education and childhood studies (UCL, UEL). Cross-cutting research themes include issues of gender in social movements, citizenship and participation; the life-course, care, love and home; space, place, nation and the environment; ‘race’/ethnicity, migration, diaspora and belonging; violence, state violence and war; learning and higher education; human rights, journalism and new media; embodiment; communities and collective life; empire and postcoloniality; religion. The consortium members have particular regional expertise in Africa, Asia/Pacific region, the Middle East and Latin America.   

The Gender and Sexuality pathway offers 1+3 routes at Birkbeck and UCL IOE, and +3 routes at Birkbeck, SOAS, UCL and UEL.  These routes provide robust research training with opportunities for students to follow their diverse interests and training needs. The Birkbeck-based 1+3 route is linked to the MSc Social Research The UCL IOE-based route is linked to the Education, Gender and International Development programmes, which are part of IOE’s extensive education-related provision. Students entering the +3 routes will have already completed a masters involving social science research, and will have received good preliminary training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, as well as having some background in gender/ sexuality issues.  All routes are offered in full-time and part-time modes; the taught component of the Birkbeck-based route is available in the evenings. 
 
Potential PhD students should apply first (by 1 December 2016) to the institution of their choice using the normal application procedure.  

Selected applicants will then have the opportunity to complete the DTP application process by 3 February 2017. 

UEL supervision and training to this pathway. Contact: Corinne Squire

Pathway overview

Pathway Leader: 
Andrew Hutchings 

Team members: 
Simon Cohn 
Jonathan Smith 
Corinne Squire 

Description:
The Health and Wellbeing pathway involves LSHTM, Birkbeck and UEL and offers three training routes. The Health Economics and the Social Science Approaches in Public Health & Health Services Research routes are based at LSHTM and are available as 1+3, +3 or +4 studentships. The Psychological Approaches to Health & Wellbeing route is based at Birkbeck and 1+3 and +3 studentships are available. Co-supervision and training in qualitative methods, particularly narrative research, is available at UEL. LSHTM has a global reputation for public health research in high-, middle-, and low-income settings and the Faculty of Public Health and Policy – which is made up of three large interdisciplinary departments and over 150 social scientists – conducts a wide range of research using the full spectrum of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Large official research centres reflect the thematic orientation (e.g. the Centre for Evaluation, the Gender Violence and Health Centre). Birkbeck’s Department of Psychological Sciences complements the work conducted at LSHTM and has world class researchers in the psychology of health and wellbeing, offering a wide range of methodological expertise. Within the department there are two principal research groups in health and wellbeing. The Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis Research Group acts as a hub for a wide range of national and international activities and resources, and conducts research in the psychology of health and wellbeing. The Institute for the Study of Children, Families, and Social Issues conducts major funded evaluations of programmes and policy initiatives that address national and international priorities in education, child and family health, and parenting support aimed at providing evidence to inform social policy. The Centre for Narrative Research at UEL is the leading centre for narrative work in the social sciences. The centre runs ‘narrative methods’ training days and symposia and several Masters level modules in narrative research and analysis.

For LSHTM routes potential applicants should email esrchw@lshtm.ac.uk. Other contacts will be confirmed shortly.

UEL contributes 1+3 (through the Masters in NGO and International Development) and +3 training routes to this pathway, as well as providing other supervision and training. Contact: Meera Tiwari, m.tiwari@uel.ac.uk. 

Pathway overview

Pathway Leader: 
Alfredo Saad Filho 

Team members: 
Dina Balabanova 
Colin Marx 
Melissa Parker
Peter Sammonds
Dimitra Stamogiannou 
Meera Tiwari
Elaine Unterhalter 

Description:
The International Development (ID) pathway draws upon London’s unique concentration of academic institutions, funding agencies and local and international NGOs to offer an unrivalled concentration of expertise in and around ID. All participating institutions are strongly committed to interdisciplinary qualitative and quantitative research and fieldwork, and seek to contribute to policymaking in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Research is rooted in a range of disciplines, including anthropology, culture and media studies, economics, education, epidemiology, gender and sexuality studies, geography, mathematics, medicine, political ecology, policy analysis, political economy, political science, sociology, and sustainability and climate change. This approach to research and policy intervention allows us to produce scholarship that blends innovative approaches with rigorous empirical analysis across a range of contexts. Within these parameters, each institution retains distinctive strengths:
  • The SOAS Departments of Development Studies and Economics are internationally recognised for their distinctive and original approaches to the political economy of development, violence and conflict, migration, political ecology, and related topics. 
  • The UCL Development Planning Unit (DPU) is one of the foremost development planning schools in the anglophone world. The DPU’s research agenda focuses on social, physical, economic and political changes in a globalising and urbanising world, across diversity, social complexity and planned intervention; states and markets; urban transformations; and environmental justice, urbanisation and resilience. 
  • The UCL Institute for Global Health (IGH) delivers world-class research on global health and development, with particular strengths in women’s, reproductive and children’s health, the health effects of climate change, risk analysis, and the health of vulnerable populations. 
  • The UCL Institute of Education (IOE) offers the largest concentration of research in education and international development in the UK, with specific expertise in gender, migration, health and wellbeing, planning, teacher development, education systems, higher education pedagogies, and critical policy analysis. 
  • The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) leads research in risk analysis, vulnerability analysis, disaster preparedness, disaster management and recovery and reconstruction across hazards (from space weather to earthquakes to climate change) and vulnerabilities (from corruption to poverty). 
  • ID research at UEL is centred in the School of Social Sciences and the Centre for Social Justice and Social Change.  Its work is interdisciplinary, with a focus on grassroots organisations, collectives and commons, gender, faith and development, the third sector, urban and rural poverty, the North-South poverty debates and humanitarian interventions.
  • The LSHTM Department of Global Health and Development (GHD) is structured around groups in Anthropology, Politics and Policy (APP), Social and Mathematical Epidemiology (SaME), and Health Economics and Systems Analysis (HESA). GHD hosts research programmes combining public health, health systems research, health economics, anthropology and policy analysis, and has an international reputation for its work on advancing affordability, equity, and coverage of health care in LMIC, as well as for rigorous evaluation methods to strengthen the policy evidence base.  
All routes within the ID pathway are available in 1+3 and +3 structures. All 1+3 structures include an MSc or MRes degree programme with methods training to support doctoral studies, plus a dissertation designed to consolidate students’ learning and provide the opportunity to pilot a PhD project. Development Economics and Education and International Development are also available via +4 Integrated PhDs, in which students take the taught components of the relevant masters alongside their doctoral research. The +3 structure is available to students who have already completed a masters with appropriate training.

Interested students should approach potential supervisors at any of our partner institutions to discuss their research projects in the first instance; alternatively, please contact the DTP representative in the relevant institution: Alfredo Saad Filho, Dina Balabanova, Colin Marx, Melissa Parker, Peter Sammonds, Dimitra Stamogiannou, Jolene Skordis-Worrall, Meera Tiwari and Elaine Unterhalter.

UEL contributes 1+3 (through Masters in Clinical and Community Psychology, International Humanitarian Psychosocial Intervention, Occupational and Organisational Psychology, and Psychological Research Methods) and +3 training routes to this pathway, as well as other supervision and training. Contact: Mark McDermott m.r.mcdermott@uel.ac.uk

Pathway overview

Pathway Leader: 
Michael Thomas 

Team members: 
Emily Farran
Mark McDermott 
Paul Marshall 

Description:
Within the Psychology Pathway, training is represented across three institutions, and a number of departments. Within Birkbeck (BBK), there is the Department of Psychological Sciences. Within the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), there is the Department of Psychology and Human Development. Within the University of East London (UEL), there is the School of Psychology within which are groupings in cognition & neuroscience, addiction, and developmental, health and social psychology. Within UCL, there are four research departments in the Faculty of Brain Sciences within the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences: Experimental Psychology (EP), the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology (CEHP), and the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience (ICN). Some research centres additionally straddle other UCL departments (Computer Science in the case of UCLIC and the Institute of Neurology in the case of the ICN). All these departments have an intensive research focus, with highly visible and internationally leading outputs and facilities, considerable external research income and extensive national and international research collaborations with other institutions. The component departments together offer a wide range of state-of-the-art research facilities, including equipment for multimodal behavioural testing, auditory and visual psychophysics, eye-movement recordings, infant testing, and brain imaging. The Psychology pathway offers great breadth, with interlocking areas of strength in development, education, social change, language, cognition, neuroscience, and computation. Thirteen training routes are available, including Clinical and Health Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Computational Modelling, Deafness and Sign Language, Decision and Cognitive Sciences, Psychology of Education, Developmental Sciences, Educational Neuroscience, Experimental Psychology, Human-Computer Interaction, Occupational and Organisational Psychology, Psychology and Social Change, Social Psychology. Both FT and PT +3 and 1+3 structures are available across all routes, and 2+3 and +4 across some. Specific Masters programmes are aligned with training routes, including some options across institutions. 

Interested students should approach relevant possible supervisors at any of our partner institutions to discuss their proposed research projects in the first instance; alternatively, interested students should contact a representative within the relevant department: Birkbeck: Prof. Michael Thomas; UCL Institute of Education: Prof. Emily Farran; UCL: Dr. Paul Marshall; UEL: Prof Mark McDermott

View staff supervision interests for the Psychology pathway.

UEL contributes supervision and training to this pathway. Contact:  David Jones, d.jones@uel.ac.uk. 

Pathway overview

Pathway Leader: 
Margarita Palacios

Team members: 
Stephen Frosh 
David Jones 

Description:
Psychosocial Studies is a new interdisciplinary field that is concerned with the interconnections between individual subjectivities, group identities, and historical and contemporary social and political formations. Its distinctive approach to research draws on a range of critical frameworks including psychoanalytic theory, social theory, feminist and queer theory, cultural and post-colonial studies and qualitative psychosocial methodologies.  Research interests lie in interdisciplinary areas such as violence, state violence and war; intimacy, parenting, care, friendship and love; learning and higher education; human rights, citizenship and social movements; embodiment; communities and collective life; ‘race’ and racism; empire and postcoloniality; religion and diaspora; gender and sexuality; youth and ageing; and mental health and psychotherapy.  

The Psychosocial training route is based at Birkbeck College. Students take two compulsory core ‘methods’ modules, Intermediate Quantitative Social Research and Qualitative Social Research plus two further modules from the discipline-specific masters programmes in Psychosocial Studies or Psychoanalytic Studies.. As part of their subject specific Psychosocial Studies training, students will also participate in the Psychosocial Studies Research Methods course that provides a systematic introduction to psychosocial methodologies (including archival research methods, narrative analysis, discourse analysis and ethnography as well as ethics training).  

These modules will all be taken in year 1 of the 1+3 mode (years 1 and 2 of part time study). Students who have already completed a Masters and are accepted onto the +3 mode will still be expected to take the Psychosocial Studies Research Methods course in their first year, and will be encouraged to audit appropriate modules from available programmes.  

Potential PhD students should apply by 1 December 2016 to the department of Psychosocial Studies at Birkbeck, however there is range of possible inter-institutional supervisory arrangements with UEL and UCL. Selected applicants will then have the opportunity to complete the DTP application process by 3 February 2017. 

UEL contributes supervision and training to this pathway. Contact: David Jones.

Pathway overview

Pathway Leader: 
Rebecca Rees 

Team members: 
David Gough 
Jan Tripney 
David Jones 

Description:
Two ESRC training routes in Social Policy are available for a 2017/18 entry: 1) Evidence for Public Policy and Practice; and 2) Social Policy and Social Research – both based at the Department of Social Science at UCL Institute of Education. Evidence for Public Policy and Practice is an interdisciplinary field of research concerned with the way research evidence is produced to inform decision-making in public policy and professional practice and the engagement of stakeholders in the production, interpretation and scrutiny of research. Its scope ranges across all the social sciences and all areas of public policy. In their PhD study, students could choose to focus on any substantive area, but would be expected to consider, possibly as part of a wider framework of analysis, the role of different approaches for systematically reviewing research literature, or the impacts of diverse stakeholder perspectives on research. Social Policy and Social Research is an interdisciplinary field concerned with extending knowledge about how research interacts with policy and practice; both the direct use of research to make decisions and the broader assimilation of research ideas, concepts and theories into policy discourse and debates. In their PhD study, students could choose to focus on any area of social policy, but would be expected to consider, possibly as part of a wider framework of analysis, the interplay between research and social policy or professional practice. 

1+3 or +3 studentships are available. 1+3 students will start their studies with either the MSc Systematic Reviews for Public Policy and Practice (Pathway 1) or the MSc Social Policy and Social Research (Pathway 2). Interested applicants should, in the first instance, make contact with a potential supervisor from within UCL IOE’s Department of Social Science, identifying which Social Policy studentship training route is of most interest. Further guidance is available here.

UEL contributes 1+3 (through the Masters in Refugee Studies, Conflict, Displacement and Human Security and, from 2018, Media Studies) and +3 training routes to this pathway, as well as providing other supervision and training. Contact: Giorgia Dona, Maja Korac and Jonathan Hardy.

Pathway overview

Pathway Leader: 
Stephen Frosh 

Team members: 
Giorgia Dona<g.dona@uel.ac.uk>
Jonathan Hardy 
Maja Korac 
Paul Watt 

Description:
Sociology in the UCL, Bloomsbury and East London DTP is highly innovative and unusual, embracing a range of sociological perspectives and particularly emphasising interdisciplinary social research. Its strengths lie in its wide thematic reach; its innovative and rigorous qualitative methodologies; its global outlook; and its commitment to ‘critical’, theory-building research. At both Birkbeck and UEL there has been ground-breaking sociological research utilising psychoanalytically-informed methods and working with narrative and discourse, which has led to the emerging field of psychosocial studies. The sociology of refugee and migration issues, and of media and culture, are also strong interests. Sociology in the DTP draws primarily on work at Birkbeck and UEL, although extensive sociological research elsewhere (UCL, SOAS) means that there are considerable joint supervision possibilities.

The sociology training routes are based at Birkbeck and UEL. The Birkbeck training route involves two compulsory core methods modules, Intermediate Quantitative Social Research and Qualitative Social Research, plus two further sociological modules from the wide range of Masters programmes in the Departments of Psychosocial Studies or Geography, Environment and Development Studies. The UEL routes rest on a common core of Qualitative and Quantitative Social Research Methods modules, which parallel Birkbeck modules, alongside core Refugee Studies and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security modules, with options from other Social Sciences and Arts and Digital Industries schools masters.  Supervision for +3 students will also be able to draw in staff working in Media Studies. At both Birkbeck and UEL, the required modules will all be taken in year 1 of the 1+3 mode (years 1 and 2 of part-time study). All formal teaching at Birkbeck and much at UEL is in the evening, making this provision highly suited to part-time students.

Potential PhD students should apply first (by 1 December 2016) to the department of their choice using the normal application procedure. Eligible departments at Birkbeck are Psychosocial Studies; Geography, Environment and Development Studies; Politics; and Film, Media and Culture Studies.  At UEL the relevant departments are in the School of Social Sciences and the School of Arts and Digital Industries. Selected applicants will then have the opportunity to complete the DTP application process by 3 February 2017.

Go back to the main UBEL Doctoral Training Partnership page.

Find out about UBEL ESRC Studentships.