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UEL

Programme Specification for BA (Hons) Youth and Community Work

 

Final award

BA (Hons)

Intermediate awards available

Cert HE, Dip HE

UCAS code

L530

Details of professional body accreditation

This BA (Hons) programme is professionally (JNC) validated by the National Youth Agency

Relevant QAA Benchmark statements

Youth and Community Work

Date specification last up-dated

November 2010

Profile

The summary - UCAS programme profile

BANNER BOX:

Youth and Community Work at UEL addresses current issues in youth and community work, exploring the relationship between theory and practice, using student experiences in the field to address issues of diversity, empowerment and rights. The programme is innovative, providing students with skills in management for the future; depending on student option choices, the programme will facilitate career paths in diverse areas of youth and community work including regeneration, community arts, and diverse and specific cultural communities.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Applicants need to have the following:

  • 240 UCAS tariff points
  • Substantial experience of youth or community work, voluntary or paid, and a reference to support this.
  • No criminal record which would prevent the student working with children or young people and a current DBS check to support this.

Students may be admitted through Accreditation of Experiential Learning (AEL) or Accreditation of Certificated Learning (ACL) processes.

In the case of applicants whose first language is not English, then IELTS 5.5 (or equivalent) is required.  International qualifications will be checked for appropriate matriculation to UK Higher Education undergraduate programmes.

ABOUT THE PROGRAMME

What is Youth and Community Work?

This programme offers a professional grounding in the closely linked fields of Youth and Community work.

The purpose of youth work is to facilitate and support young people’s growth through dependence to interdependence, by encouraging their personal and social development and enabling them to have a voice, influence and place in their communities and society.  Youth work is informed by a set of beliefs which include a commitment to equal opportunity, to young people as partners in learning and decision-making and to helping young people to develop their own sets of values. We recognise youth work by these qualities:

  • it offers its services in places where young people can choose to participate;
  • it encourages young people to be critical in their responses to their own experience and to the world around them;
  • it works with young people to help them make informed choices about their personal responsibilities within their communities;
  • it works alongside school and college-based education to encourage young
  • People to achieve and fulfil their potential; and it works with other agencies to encourage society to be responsive to young people’s needs.

Based on Davies, B. (1996)

The purpose of Community work is to enable people to act together. Community work assumes that within any community there is a wealth of knowledge and experience which, if used in creative ways, results in high levels of participation and can be channelled into collective action to achieve the communities' desired goals.

Community workers, working alongside people in communities, build relationships with key people and organisations, facilitating the identification of common concerns, and helping to build autonomous groups. They create opportunities for non-formal learning which will help to increase the capacity of communities and foster social inclusion and equality.

Youth and Community work at UEL

The location: Within the UEL Cass School of Education in the middle of the massive regeneration zone centred on Stratford , also the new gateway to Europe . You will be studying in the area where policy makers are exploring new ways of dealing with youth and community issues, from the inner city to the reaches of the Thames Gateway.

Programme structure

The first year of the programme seeks to give students grounding in the theoretical concepts involved in youth and community work and provides students with the chance to explore and reflect on their own practice through observation, and through work in the field. In years two and three students choose module options to explore interests in disability, citizenship, social movements and gender issues in order to diversify and explore individual interests and career paths. This is consolidated by field work placements in youth and community locations.

Learning environment

Lectures, seminars, study groups, practical projects, field work placements, web-based learning.

Assessment

Assessment for the modules in this programme include; portfolios of evidence, essays, case studies, research reports, presentations and field work practice experience which demonstrate that students have met the module’s  learning outcomes.

Work experience/placement opportunities

A ‘fieldwork’ module features at levels 1, 2 and 3 of the programme. At the end of these modules students will have participated in a supervised work based learning experience, a minimum of 50% of which will have been with young people, (in accordance with National Youth Agency requirements).

Project work

There are opportunities for students to develop own ideas/work in groups, research specific topics, to produce projects on placements, fundraising proposals and projects, arts projects.

Added value

  • Professional JNC youth work qualification
  • Transferable skills for a wide range of work settings and career paths.
  • Job opportunities often emerge from field work practice.

IS THIS THE PROGRAMME FOR ME?

If you are interested in...

  • Working with youth and community groups
  • Regeneration
  • Community cohesion
  • Community development
  • Human rights and the rights of the child
  • Issues of diversity – race, class, gender, sexuality, disability
  • Leadership
  • Citizenship
  • Empowering people

If you enjoy...

  • A challenge
  • Diversity
  • Working in groups
  • Field Work Practice
  • IT communications

If you want...

  • A professional qualification in youth work
  • A programme which addresses the major issues of youth and community work in the twenty-first century, giving a range of opportunities for individual development and exploration in a wide range of areas.
  • A programme which is flexible to address the needs of students already working in the youth and community field.

Your future career

  • A degree in Youth and Community Work from UEL will show a prospective employer that you have developed critical skills in the field, that you are a flexible and thoughtful practitioner, and that you have also developed transferable practical skills in researching, leadership and management and writing presenting and organising ideas along side working in youth and community settings.
  • Progression to further study at UEL: MA Youth and Community Studies
  • Career paths: youth work and community work; children’s services, youth offending, local authorities and national government; jobs in regeneration zones with a community or youth focus.

How we support you

  • An enthusiastic experienced team
  • Professional mentors on placement
  • Personal tutors at UEL
  • Module tutors
  • Student help-desk in-school
  • State of the art specialist teaching facilities
  • An excellent learning resource centre

Bonus factors

  • Location – London and the Thames Gateway region and close to the new Eurostar terminal and the continent
  • A range of interesting placement opportunities

Outcomes

Programme aims and learning outcomes

What is this programme designed to achieve?

This programme is designed to give you the opportunity to:

  • Experience significant and challenging opportunities for professional development through youth and community fieldwork practice (placements)
  • Develop the skills and understanding of the reflective practitioner in order to create programmes of personal and social education
  • Develop transferable academic skills in reading, writing, speaking
  • Explore the key issues in youth and community work for the twenty-first century

What will you learn?

Knowledge

  • demonstrate knowledge of Youth and Community Work in its historical, political and organisational contexts
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the principles of informal education and community development which underpin Youth and Community Work
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the importance of professional values in working in Youth and Community settings
  • develop knowledge of current themes and priorities in Youth and Community Work

Thinking skills

  • develop analytical and critical approaches to theory and knowledge
  • develop the skills of a reflective practitioner in non-formal educational settings
  • develop abilities in approaching complex Youth and Community issues and the skills to recognise, respond and lead change
  • develop skills in gathering, analysing and summarising information within a practice setting
  • to undertake research from a variety of theoretical perspectives

Subject-Based Practical skills

  • develop the ability to work independently
  • develop the skills of informal education and group work
  • to work effectively within a team and across disciplinary boundaries
  • develop the skills to communicate effectively to diverse audiences, including planning and delivering presentations
  • work within ethical and value-led boundaries and in association with other professionals
  • develop the skills to create programmes of non-formal education for youth and community groups
  • develop ICT skills

Skills for life and work (general skills)

  • develop self management skills in organising learning
  • develop time-management skills and the ability to prioritise tasks
  • communicate effectively in a variety of media to diverse audiences
  • develop the ability to interpret and present information in a critical and constructive way
  • develop the ability to organise and articulate opinions, arguments, and information in speech and in writing
  • develop the ability work effectively as part of a team, including working through conflict
  • work effectively in a variety of organisational settings
  • develop the ability identify, understand and respond to change

Structure

The programme structure

Introduction

All programmes are credit-rated to help you to understand the amount and level of study that is needed.

One credit is equal to 10 hours of directed study time (this includes everything you do e.g. lecture, seminar and private study).

Credits are assigned to one of 5 levels:

  • 0 - equivalent in standard to GCE 'A' level and is intended to prepare students for year one of an undergraduate degree programme
  • 1 - equivalent in standard to the first year of a full-time undergraduate degree programme
  • 2 - equivalent in standard to the second year of a full-time undergraduate degree programme
  • 3 - equivalent in standard to the third year of a full-time undergraduate degree programme
  • M - equivalent in standard to a Masters degree

Credit rating

The overall credit-rating of this programme is 360 credits.

Typical duration

The expected duration of this programme is three years when attended in full-time mode or longer in part-time mode. It is possible to move from a full-time mode of study to a part-time mode of study and vice-versa, to accommodate any external factors such as financial constraints or domestic commitments. Many of our students make use of this flexibility and this may impact on the overall duration of their study period.

How the teaching year is divided

The teaching year begins in September and ends in June, but some programmes also allow students to join at the start of Semester B, in February. A student, normally registering for 6 modules in one year (3 modules in each Semester) would do so in a full-time attendance mode of study and a student registering for up to 4 modules in one year (2 modules in each Semester) would do so in part-time attendance mode of study.

What you will study when

This programme is part of a modular degree scheme. A student registered in a full-time attendance mode will take six 20 credit modules per year. An honours degree student will complete six modules at level one, six at level 2 and six at level 3.

It is possible to bring together modules from one field with modules from another to produce a combined programme. Subjects are offered in a variety of combinations however please note that National Youth Agency validation will apply only for students on the single programme:

  • Single - 120 credits at levels one, two and three
  • Major - 80 credits at levels one, two and three
  • Joint - 60 credits at levels one, two and three
  • Minor - 40 credits at levels one, two and three

Modules are defined as:

  • Core - Must be taken
  • Option - Select from a range of identified module within the field
  • UEL Wide Option - Select from a wide range of UEL wide options

The following pages show the core and optional requirements for the single and major programmes.

The following are the core and optional requirements for the single and major pathways for this programme

The following are the core and optional requirements for the single and major routes for this programme

Level 1

LEVELTITLESkills
Module
CREDITSSTATUS
SINGLE
STATUS
MAJOR
STATUS
JOINT
STATUS
MINOR

1

ED1000:Critical Reading and Writing

Y

20

Core

Core

Option

-

1

ED1021: Introduction to Youth and
Community Work

-

20

Core

Core

Core

Core

1

ED1028: Communication,
Mentoring and Counselling Skills
for Youth and Community Work

-

20

Core

Core

Core

Option

1

ED1038Field work Practice – foundations one

-

20

Core

-

-

-

1

ED1039   Field Work Practice foundations - two

-

20

Core

-

-

-

1

ED1017: Youth, culture and policy

-

20

Core

 Core

Core

Option

Level 2

2

ED2000: Research Design and
Method

Y

20

Core

Core

Option*

-

2

ED2041: Anti discriminatory
Practice in Youth and Community Work

-

20

Core

Core

Core

Core

2

ED2027: Field work practice - interventions

-

40

Core

-

-

-

2

ED2032: Youth Crime and Gangs:
Definitions and Interventions

-

20

Core

 Option

Option

-

2

ED2060 Young People in a Global
Society

-

20

 Option

Option

Option

Option

2

ED2003 Challenging Disability

-

20

Option

Option

Option

Option

Level 3

3

ED3000: Independent Research Project

-

40

Core

Core

Option*

-

3

ED3026: Field work practice: Specialism

Y

40

Core

-

-

-

3

ED3027: Managing and leading Youth and Community Work

-

20

Core

 Core

 Core

 Core

3

ED3022: Gender Security and Education For All

-

20

Option

 Option

Option

Option

 

ED3028 Inclusion

-

20

Option

Option

Option

Option

* note that students must take the module unless the equivalent skill/dissertation module is taken in the student’s other joint programme

Requirements for gaining an award

In order to gain an honours degree you will need to obtain 360 credits including:

  • A minimum of 120 credits at level one or higher
  • A minimum of 120 credits at level two or higher
  • A minimum of 120 credits at level three or higher

In order to gain an ordinary degree you will need to obtain a minimum of 300 credits including:

  • A minimum of 120 credits at level one or higher
  • A minimum of 120 credits at level two or higher
  • A minimum of 60 credits at level three or higher

In order to gain a Diploma of Higher Education you will need to obtain at least 240 credits including a minimum of 120 credits at level one or higher and 120 credits at level two or higher

In order to gain a Certificate of Higher Education you will need to obtain 120 credits at level one or higher.

In order to gain a Foundation Degree you will need to obtain a minimum of 240 credits including:

  • A minimum of 120 credits at level one or higher
  • A minimum of 120 credits at level two or higher

(A foundation degree is linked to a named Honours degree onto which a student may progress after successful completion of the Foundation degree.)

Degree Classification

Where a student is eligible for an Honours degree, and has gained a minimum of 240 UEL credits at level 2 or level 3 on the programme, including a minimum of 120 UEL credits at level 3, the award classification is determined by calculating:

The arithmetic mean of the best 100 credits at level 3

×

2/3

+

The arithmetic mean of the next best 100 credits at levels 2 and/or 3

×

1/3

and applying the mark obtained as a percentage, with all decimals points rounded up to the nearest whole number, to the following classification

70% - 100%

First Class Honours

60% - 69%

Second Class Honours, First Division

50% - 59%

Second Class Honours, Second Division

40% - 49%

Third Class Honours

0% - 39%

Not passed

Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment

Teaching and learning

Knowledge is developed through

  • Lectures, seminars, workshops
  • Discussion and in-class activities
  • Private study to consolidate understanding of key issues
  • Field Work Practice (placements)
  • Activities and work associated with the field work practice
  • The use of audio-visual aids
  • Group work sessions within the learning environment and outside these times
  • Research seminars and talks organised by the School of Education
  • Reading and study for modules, coursework and exams

Thinking skills are developed through

  • Understanding, analysing and applying theory and theoretical models, in the context of youth and community work, and via placements and through UEL sessions; and synthesising solutions to show original and creative thought
  • Planning, managing, and reflecting on learning and progression, in acquiring graduate attributes towards a career in youth and community work

Practical skills and skills for life and work are developed through

  • The wide spectrum of tasks involved in the programme
  • Challenging practice within the field
  • Project and course work requiring a variety of skills
  • Participation in group work within modules and in the field necessitating skills of empathetic interaction and communication

Assessment

Each module is assessed through one or two assignments, linked to learning outcomes. The assignments may take a variety of forms including:

Knowledge is assessed by

  • Coursework assignments – reports, essays, learning journals, presentations
  • Fieldwork practice reports

Thinking skills are assessed by

  • Analysis of placement observations
  • Reflective journals
  • Coursework assignments
  • Participation seminars, workshops and tutorials

Practical skills are assessed by

  • Presentations
  • Research project
  • Fieldwork practice reports

Skills for life and work (general skills) are assessed by

  • Fieldwork practice reports
  • Presentation of data in research projects and other assignments
  • The student’s own reflection on placement

Quality

How we assure the quality of this programme

Before this programme started

Before the programme started, the following was checked:

  • there would be enough qualified staff to teach the programme;
  • adequate resources would be in place;
  • the overall aims and objectives were appropriate;
  • the content of the programme met national benchmark requirements;
  • the programme met any professional/statutory body requirements;
  • the proposal met other internal quality criteria covering a range of issues such as admissions policy, teaching, learning and assessment strategy and student support mechanisms.

This is done through a process of programme approval which involves consulting academic experts including some subject specialists from other institutions

How we monitor the quality of this programme

The quality of this programme is monitored each year through evaluating:

  • external examiner reports (considering quality and standards);
  • statistical information (considering issues such as the pass rate);
  • student feedback.

Drawing on this and other information programme teams undertake the annual Review and Enhancement Process which is co-ordinated at School level and includes student participation. The process is monitored by UELs Quality Standing Committee.

Once every six years an in-depth review of the whole field is undertaken by a panel that includes at least two external subject specialists. The panel considers documents, looks at student work, speaks to current and former students and speaks to staff before drawing its conclusions. The result is a report highlighting good practice and identifying areas where action is needed.

The role of the programme committee

This programme has a programme committee comprising all relevant teaching staff, student representatives and others who make a contribution towards the effective operation of the programme (e.g. library/technician staff). The committee has responsibilities for the quality of the programme. It provides input into the operation of the Review and Enhancement Process and proposes changes to improve quality. The programme committee plays a critical role in UELs quality assurance procedures.

The role of external examiners

The standard of this programme is monitored by at least one external examiner. External examiners have two primary responsibilities:

  • To ensure the standard of the programme;
  • To ensure that justice is done to individual students.

External examiners fulfil these responsibilities in a variety of ways including:

  • Approving exam papers/assignments;
  • Attending assessment boards;
  • Reviewing samples of student work and moderating marks;
  • Ensuring that regulations are followed;
  • Providing feedback through an annual report that enables us to make improvements for the future.

Listening to the views of students

The following methods for gaining student feedback are used on this programme:

  • Module evaluations
  • Student representation on programme committees (meeting 2 times year)
  • Student/Staff consultative committee (meeting 3 times a year)

Students are notified of the action taken through:

  • circulating the minutes of the programme committee
  • providing details on the programme notice board

Listening to the views of others

The following methods are used for gaining the views of other interested parties:

  • Liaison between UEL and mentors and workers at placements
  • Annual student satisfaction questionnaire
  • Questionnaires to former students

Further Information

Alternative locations for studying this programme

LocationWhich elements?Taught by UEL staffTaught by local staffMethod of Delivery

-

-

-

-

-

Where you can find further information

Further information about this programme is available from:

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