‌ This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. See our Privacy Statement

Close

UEL

Programme Specification for Professional Doctorate Counselling Psychology

 

Final award

Professional Doctorate

Intermediate awards available

None

UCAS code

N/A

Details of professional body accreditation

Accreditation by the British Psychological Society and approval by the Health and Care Professions Council

Relevant QAA Benchmark statements

N/A

Date specification last up-dated

February 2014

Profile

The summary - programme advertising leaflet

Programme content

Counselling Psychology is embedded in the discipline of psychology and concerns itself with applied areas of psychological work, which overlap with the provinces of psychotherapy, clinical psychology, counselling and psychiatry.  The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is therefore designed to provide opportunities for professional and personal development as a Counselling Psychologist.  This is achieved by facilitating the development of a flexible, reflective and critical approach to Counselling Psychology theory, research, and practice. 

The programme objective is to produce graduates with a solid grounding in the theory, research and clinical skills relevant to Counselling Psychology. The clinical focus of the training in years 1 and 2 is Cognitive Behaviour Therapy including second and third wave CBT with core skills drawn also from Humanistic Therapy.  In the third and fourth year of the training trainees will consider Psychodynamic and integrative approaches. We aim to equip our trainees to meet the unique needs of their clients; they will be able to work while holding ideas in tension and embracing dilemmas within their therapeutic practice.

Counselling Psychology at UEL

  • An innovative and large school of psychology which contains doctoral programmes in most of the major areas of psychology, i.e. Clinical, Educational & Organisational
  • The School of Psychology contains a range of national and international experts within their research specialisms.
  • Support with finding clinical training placements
  • Graduate with high quality research aimed at publication

Admission requirements

Essential: 

  • A good honours degree in psychology (trainees normally have a 1st or 2:1) and conferring the Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society.
  • Competencies in oral and written English which should satisfy the University’s entrance requirements. In the case of applicants whose first language is not English, then IELTS 7.5 (or equivalent) is required which incorporates a minimum of 7.5 in writing and speaking, together with a minimum of 7.5 in listening and reading. International qualifications will be checked for appropriate matriculation to UK Higher Education postgraduate programmes.  Such assessment of English language competence must normally have been undertaken no more than two years prior to application, though relevant and more recent study in a United Kingdom Higher Education Institution may be accepted as sufficient proof of ability.
  • Appropriate personal qualities including, empathy, warmth, genuineness; an awareness of the nature of prejudice and oppression; commitment to self development.
  • Prior training in counselling skills/relevant work (voluntary or otherwise) of working in helping relationships.
  • Previous experience of supervised counselling practice.

The admissions policy strives to provide equal opportunities to all applicants and does not discriminate on the grounds of age, race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.  Applicants are invited for interview on the basis of relevant experience and academic excellence.

International qualifications will be checked for appropriate matriculation to UK Higher Education postgraduate programmes.

Students that apply to enter stages of the programme may be admitted through normal Accreditation of Experiential Learning (AEL) or Accreditation of Certificated Learning (ACL) processes, or through an approved articulation agreement. Therefore such applicants must be able to demonstrate and evidence that they have the required learning outcomes as listed in the modules for which they are seeking exemption. Previous experience considered relevant for AEL or ACL must be gained from a University that is accredited by the BPS and approved by the HCPC and which maps onto the relevant learning outcomes.  References will be requested from the previous University. Year of entry will depend on relevant learning outcomes being met on a prior counselling psychology programme.

Formal checks undertaken by the university

You will be expected to complete a DBS check and Health questionnaire prior to starting the programme and expected to tell the programme team about any changes to your physical and mental health and DBS status during your training.  Applicants can access the DBS policy (the university will seek an enhanced DBS disclosure) and university equality and diversity information to help them with their application process (for DBS information) http://www.uel.ac.uk/marketing/admissions/documents/crbchecks.pdf

The university staff will follow their own internal procedures in determining your health, fitness to practise and any information relating to your DBS check, both at the application stage and throughout your time as a trainee at UEL

HCPC checks  On successful completion of all aspects of the programme you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. Entry to the register is not guaranteed and will depend on supporting health and character references. At this stage we would strongly advise you to read the HCPC documents on registering with the HCPC and would draw your attention to the ‘Guidance for Health and Character’ document before submitting your application (see www.hpc-uk.org/assets/.../10002C17Guidanceonhealthandcharacter and www.hpc-uk.org/.../10002C16Guidanceonconductandethicsforstudents.

The role of the HCPC is to protect the public, consequently, as part of the application process you will be asked to disclose any relevant health or character issues and or criminal convictions.

Programme structure

Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology (PsychD) 

Please note: All components of the four year part time programme need to be completed to achieve Doctoral status and to become eligible for Chartership with the British Psychological Society and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The structure of the Professional Doctorate Programme is four years part time (attending for one day a week, with at least one day on a clinical placement).

Professional doctorate programmes can be either ‘taught’ or ‘research’ in their emphasis (that is, when measured by student effort).  Both have equal status and share the same learning outcomes.  You should check with the relevant school to find out where the emphasis is for this particular programme.

Learning environment

The teaching methods used are varied and include: workshops, lectures, discussions, experiential group work, skills work in small groups, clinical discussion groups, personal therapy/development work, seminars, feedback on recorded sessions, dissertation supervision, practical work and self-directed private study. There is the additional facility of a web based learning tool for student directed learning.

Assessment

The assessment approaches considered most appropriate for this subject area are those of continuous assessment.  It is our view that the method of assessment is central to the learning process

The aim of our approach is two-fold; it seeks not only to assess students' progress but also to encourage and foster achievement of high standards of performance in both practice and theory.  Accordingly, it seeks to promote and evaluate both students' academic development and their practical ability to react positively and proactively to the needs of clients in a variety of settings and to respond constructively to societal change within the framework of professional requirements.

Assessment is designed to test student progress in developing powers of perception, recall, critical analysis, reflection, flexibility, and creative imagination and to assess personal growth.  It is intended to be progressive, both encouraging and reflecting an increasing depth of critical understanding and the continuing development of essential professional expertise and attitudes. Assessment is ongoing and includes, essays, clinical papers, presentations and a professional and personal log.  In line with university requirements we expect trainees to attend all organised classes, if your attendance drops below 80% of attendance you will have deemed to have withdrawn from the programme.

Relevance to work/profession

  • This is an applied professional programme, completion of which leads to eligibility for chartered psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) (please note: completion of the programme does not automatically mean registration with the HCPC). The programme is accredited by the BPS and approved by the HCPC.  Many trainees use their work place as one of their clinical placement
  • The programme enables graduates to apply for paid work as counsellors or trainee Counselling Psychologists as they continue to work towards full chartered Counselling Psychologist status and registration with the HCPC.

COSTS

Course Fees

When considering the feasibility of undertaking the training it may help you to be aware of the costs involved.  The course fees are advertised on the University website www.uel.ac.uk/fees/ . The fee is set annually and subject to an inflationary increase each year.  

Supervision and Personal Therapy

Supervision provided by the NHS is usually free of charge.  The cost of supervision and personal therapy can vary although many Chartered/Registered Counselling Psychologists will offer reduced rates for Trainee Counselling Psychologists.   Information about possible costs can be located on the BPS website. www.bps.org.uk

Professional indemnity insurance

You must have professional indemnity insurance; this is a condition of enrolment on the programme and is to safeguard trainees, clients and placements.  It is essential that trainees take out personal liability insurance in addition to that provided by their placement. The costs for insurance will depend on the cover chosen.  Further details relating to insurance can be obtained from the programme team.

Research/project work

Trainees are given the opportunity in the first year to develop individual research ideas and receive lectures, individual feedback and attend workshops to assist in this process and to start producing a research proposal.

Registration of the research component can only take place following a formal recommendation from the relevant School Research Degrees Sub-Committee (SRDSC) to the institutional Research Degrees Subcommittee (RDS) on the suitability of the candidate to undertake the programme of research, of the supervision arrangements and of the research environment.

These approvals require appropriate academic judgement to be brought to bear on the viability of each research proposal. The results of the Registration Panel are submitted to the School Research Degrees Sub-Committee (SRDSC) for consideration and thence to the Research Degrees Subcommittee (RDS) for final approval.

Candidates for a Professional Doctorate must, prior to the submission of the research derived assessment, successfully complete all assessed elements from the taught part of the programme.  Once the research stage of the programme is reached progression will be formally reviewed annually by a Panel comprised of staff with appropriate academic and professional expertise who are independent of the candidate’s supervisory team. The doctoral thesis has a word count of 30,000 words. The School Research Degrees Sub-Committee (SRDSC) and the Research Degrees Subcommittee (RDS) monitor the reports from these Panels.

The examination of the research component of the Professional Doctorate has two stages: firstly the submission and preliminary assessment of the research; and secondly its defence by oral examination.

Added value

  • Good links with NHS trusts, specialist projects, preparation for conference presentations, opportunity to be taught by a range of experts.
  • We view our trainees as professionals in training and encourage their active participation in, and ownership of their training.
  • Regular reviews and feedback mirrors the programme philosophy of openness, regular review, trainee centred learning and critical analysis
  • A programme team with extensive and varied training and clinical experience who are both clinicians and active contributors to the research literature and to developing Counselling Psychology as speciality
  • Multi-cultural composition of trainee group, location in a vibrant multi-cultural community and staff and trainee expertise in this area
  • The programme prides itself on the time for personal attention and support given to our trainees, (this is detailed further in the section below).

Your future career

HCPC registration as a Counselling Psychologist enables people to work as Counselling Psychologists within the NHS, private practice and other relevant agencies.

How we support you

Each trainee has a personal tutor whom they meet formally twice a semester but whom they can make an appointment to meet at any time. We have a placement tutor to support the process of finding, monitoring and completing clinical placements.

Each trainee has a clinical skills tutor whom they meet weekly in some parts of the programme and fortnightly at others.  Weekly programme meetings are held where any relevant issues can be raised and dealt with quickly and efficiently.  Each year group has a programme representative who represents the trainees at programme committee meetings and can represent the trainee group to the programme team. Each year group has a year tutor who is responsible for the smooth running of that year.  Trainees are encouraged to set up peer support groups.  Each trainee is supported in their research by their dissertation supervisory team who will meet with them regularly

Trainees also have access to relevant learning materials available through the learning resource centre which has excellent data bases on line providing many full text articles accessible from UEL or trainees own homes.  The learning resource centre also has a range of relevant book and journals and inter-library loans are available.  The Graduate and Quality Assurance department/school are responsible for providing a focus to the support of our postgraduate research students and for our institution’s research and scholarly strategy.

Professional Doctorate students will have at least two and not normally more than three supervisors, who together demonstrate an appropriate range of academic and professional experience.  One supervisor shall be the Director of Studies with responsibility to supervise the candidate on a regular basis.

Outcomes

Programme aims and learning outcomes

What is this programme designed to achieve?

This programme is designed to give you the opportunity to meet the standards required by the BPS (2010) ‘Standards for Doctoral Programmes in Counselling Psychology’ and the HCPC (2010) ‘Standards of Proficiency, for Practitioner Psychologists’. 

Successful completion of this programme is designed to enable you to; Successful completion of the programme will enable you to:

1. Demonstrate the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment in a range of contexts, requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and largely autonomous initiative in complex professional and unpredictable situations, in professional or equivalent environments. 

2. Work within the context of statutory legal obligations and to be personally and professionally accountable to HCPC and BPS guidance and codes of conduct and ethics. To practice in a non-discriminatory manner understanding of the principles of ethics, value systems, difference and diversity, respecting the rights, values and dignity of clients. Valuing reflective practice as central to clinical work and engaging in continuing personal development through further training, supervision and personal therapy. 

3. Be able to practice in a variety of contexts, autonomously or as part of a multidisciplinary team with a range of client groups and to be able to communicate accordingly, depending on context.  Develop and maintain a collaborate working relationship with clients (and their carers/families where relevant), understanding issues of power and boundaries within the context of therapeutic and other professional relationships and how this can be managed appropriately.

4. Understand and work within the parameters of confidentiality and record keeping, understanding the importance of obtaining consent. 

5. Exercise professional judgment and duty of care, including self management, fitness to practice, personal conduct and ensuring safety within the working environment.

6. Have developed interpersonal sensitivities, qualities, abilities and competencies required to establish, maintain and conclude professional helping relationships. Utilise ongoing personal development and supervision to reflect upon the meaning and processes of the therapeutic relationship (including the use of the self.)

7. To have developed a competency in cognitive behaviour therapy, to have a working knowledge of psychodynamic principles and develop an individual synthesis of these and other evidence based models where relevant.

8. Conduct evidence based assessment and formulation for the individual needs of clients, acknowledging risk factors, ensuring that treatment plans meet the psychosocial needs of the client and context. To be able to critically reflect on assessment and formulation as tentative and ongoing, to monitor and review the effectiveness of the therapeutic process.

9. Understand the centrality of the therapeutic alliance within theoretical models in counselling psychology.

10. Understand the concept of the scientist practitioner model in counselling psychology, and be able to critically reflect and evaluate psychotherapeutic theory and psychological research relevant to counselling psychology practice, including a focus on the philosophy that underpins a relationally focussed lifespan approach to theory.

11.Continue to undertake and critically engage with pure and/or original research, service evaluations, outcome and efficacy at an advanced level contributing substantially to the development of new counselling psychology techniques, ideas and approaches and to present these ideas accurately.

12. Demonstrate an ability to make informed judgements on complex issues within Counselling Psychology, often in the absence of complete data, and be able to communicate their ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

What will you learn?

All modules are core and each must be passed. This is to ensure that trainees are safe and well trained practitioners able to offer high quality services to the public through the NHS or other agencies when their programme is completed.

Knowledge skills

  • A detailed understanding of a range of psychological theories and psychotherapeutic theory
  • Ability to integrate psychological and psychotherapeutic theory into clinical practice.  
  • Possess a high level of professional and ethical behaviour, to not work beyond level of competence and to abide by BPS, HCPC and placement guidance and codes of ethics.

Thinking skills

  • The development of an open, flexible and critical approach to Counselling Psychology theory, research and practice
  • Trainees will take responsibility for their own learning and self development when they are trainees at UEL and afterwards for their continuing professional development, this may include research, scholarship and contributions to the profession
  • Developed skills in critical analysis and be able to apply this to a range of psychological and psychotherapeutic theory
  • Adoption of  an open and flexible approach to the critique of theory and research

Subject-Based Practical skills

Will have developed;

  • a competency in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and to have a working knowledge of psychodynamic principles and develop an individual synthesis of these models during training and to be able to evaluate and engage with this appropriately in relation to the individual needs of clients
  • an understanding of the principles of ethics, value systems, difference and diversity and to be able to reflect upon this as integral to clinical practice
  • interpersonal sensitivities, qualities, abilities and competencies required to establish, maintain and conclude professional helping relationships with clients
  • Presentation of clinical, academic and research topics

Skills for life and work (general skills)

Will have developed;

  • Critical and analytical skills
  • Recognition of the need for ongoing professional and personal development and the ability to reflect on their own learning process
  • The ability to work, safely, effectively autonomously and as part of a team
  • Good communication and presentation skills

Structure

The programme structure

Introduction

All programmes are credit-rated to help you to understand the amount and level of study that is needed.

One credit is equal to 10 hours of directed study time (this includes everything you do e.g. lecture, seminar and private study).

Credits are assigned to one of 5 levels:

  • 0 equivalent in standard to GCE 'A' level and is intended to prepare students for year one of an undergraduate degree programme
  • 1 equivalent in standard to the first year of a full-time undergraduate degree programme
  • 2 equivalent in standard to the second year of a full-time undergraduate degree programme
  • 3 equivalent in standard to the third year of a full-time undergraduate degree programme
  • M equivalent in standard to a Masters degree
  • D equivalent in standard to a Doctorate degree

Typical duration

The normal minimum and maximum periods of registration for a Professional Doctorate are as follows:

Part-time - (Minimum) 33 months - (Maximum) 60 months

Registration should take place within 18 calendar months of enrolment.

How the teaching year is divided

The teaching year begins in September and ends in June. Trainees attend one day per week over 4 years and are expected to work within their clinical placement at least one day a week. 

What you will study when

Year& Level

 

Module title

credit

status

1
M
Semester a

(PYM 301)

Psychological Knowledge as Applied to Counselling Psychology

30

Core

1
M
Semester b

(PYM302)

Theoretical Models 1

30

Core

1
M
Semester b

(PYM 303)

Clinical  & Research Skills

30

Core

2
D
Semester a

(PYD 304)

Research Methods and Enquiry

60

Core

2
M
Semester b

(PYM 305)

Professional, Clinical and Ethical Issues

30

Core

3
D
Semester a

(PYD306)

AdvancedResearch Methods and Data Analysis in Counselling  Psychology 

60

Core

3
D
Semester b

(PYD 307)

Professional and Theoretical Practice
Models                              

60

Core

4
D
Semester a

(PYD308)

Advanced Clinical Skills

60

Core

4
D
Semester b

(PYD 309)

Integrating theory, research and practice

 60

Core

In addition trainees will submit a 30,000 doctoral thesis and undergo a viva, this will be submitted in semester C of the academic year.  The completed dissertation would carry 120 credits.  As with a PhD the trainees work on their doctoral thesis throughout their time on the programme and submit monitoring reports, attend annual reviews and write and epistemological essay, so that much of the preparation of the thesis is conducted in advance of the final write up. Students cannot be awarded their doctorate until all taught modules and their thesis have been passed – i.e. they can still submit their thesis even if not all modules have been passed.

Further Information

Successful completion of the entire programme will lead to eligibility for Chartered Counselling Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society and eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment

Teaching and learning

Knowledge is developed through

  • A detailed understanding of a range of psychological theories and psychotherapeutic theory and their relevance to research
  • Possess a high level of professional and ethical behaviour, to not work beyond their level of competence and to abide by the BPS & HCPC guidance and codes of ethics and conduct

Thinking skills are developed through

  • The development of an open, flexible and critical approach to Counselling Psychology theory, research and practice
  • Trainees will take responsibility for their own learning and self development when they are trainees at UEL and afterwards for their continuing professional development, this may include research, scholarship and contributions to the profession
  • Use of supervision to evaluate and critically analyse clinical practice and be able to apply this to a range of psychological and psychotherapeutic theory
  • Adoption of  an open and flexible approach to the critique of theory and research

Practical skills
Trainees will have developed;

  • an understanding of the principles of ethics, value systems, difference and diversity and to be able to reflect upon this as integral to clinical and research practice
  • interpersonal sensitivities, qualities, abilities and competencies required to establish, maintain and conclude professional relationships with  research participants

Skills for life and work (general skills) are developed through

  • Critical and analytical skills
  • Recognition of the need for ongoing professional and personal development and the ability to reflect on their own learning process
  • The ability to work, safely, effectively autonomously and as part of a team
  • Good communication and presentation skills
  • Use of supervision to ensure safe, ethical practice in the conduct of clinical and research work

Assessment

Knowledge is developed through

  • Formal teaching sessions and experiential workshops, including small group work, to encourage the development of critical analysis and debate regarding theory and research
  • Formal teaching and group work regarding research methods and epistemological relevance to Counselling Psychology
  • The above knowledge will be further generated through additional independent study and student support group work

Thinking skills are developed through

  • Group discussions, development of personal and professional reflective practice
  • Independent study evidence of this integrated into experiential workshops and assignments
  • Clinical supervision, including development of individual learning through personal and professional log entries

Practical skills are developed through

  • Experiential workshops
  • Small group work, triads, role plays, DVD exercises to develop clinical skills
  • Clinical placement supervision and case presentation workshops
  • Personal therapy

Skills for life and work (general skills) are developed through

  • Skills for applying theory to practice, understanding client problems, designing and delivering appropriate psychological services and ability to evaluate this from an evidence based perspective
  • The integration of the BPS & HCPC codes of ethics and conduct as key in all aspects of the learning experience, to apply this consistently throughout training

The above developed through combination of learning opportunities from the programme and fellow students and placement learning.

Knowledge is assessed by
Completion of essays, clinical papers, annual monitoring reviews, presentations and the submission of a doctoral thesis

  • Evidence of critical analysis, will include the following:
  • Demonstrated links between theory and practice.
  • Demonstrated competencies in their chosen speciality

Thinking skills are assessed by

  • Ability to demonstrate confidence in a growing professional ability to innovate and respond to practice demands and demonstrate recognition of their own role as co-operative and facilitative 'partners in care'.
  • Ability to develop skills within programme work of critical analysis of theory and capacity for original thought and evidenced through all aspects of programme work:

Practical skills are assessed by

  • Evidenced through all aspects of programme work
  • Ability to make critical comparisons of practice in a variety of settings with a view to the formation of their own practice model
  • Evidence of self motivation, reflective capacity and constructive self criticism
  • As evidenced in the personal and profession log, skills in continued professional and personal development demonstrates core skills in reflective practice, demonstrated by identifying key learning areas, experiences of this, reflections on the process, including what they have learned and need to further develop, strengths and weakness, ethical knowledge

Skills for life and work (general skills) are assessed by

  • Evidence in personal and professional log book of an ability to co-operate with colleagues and other professionals in a multi-cultural setting, evidence of evidence based methods of evaluating their practice
  • Evidence of ability to work independently
  • Ability to demonstrate critical awareness of current professional and policy issues and their implications for clinical practice
  • Insight and clear reflection on constructive criticism of their practice with a focus on what they need to learn
  • Ability to show flexibility and adaptability in response to the requirements of Counselling Psychology practice

Quality

How we assure the quality of this programme

Before this programme started

Before this programme started, the following was checked:

  • there would be enough qualified staff to teach the programme;
  • adequate resources would be in place;
  • the overall aims and objectives were appropriate;
  • the content of the programme met national benchmark requirements;
  • the programme met any professional/statutory body requirements;
  • the proposal met other internal quality criteria covering a range of issues such as admissions policy, teaching, learning  and assessment strategy and student support mechanisms.

This is done through a process of programme approval which involves consulting academic experts including some subject specialists from other institutions.

How we monitor the quality of this programme

The quality of this programme is monitored each year through evaluating:

  • external examiner reports (considering quality and standards);
  • statistical information (considering issues such as the pass rate);
  • trainee feedback.

Drawing on this and other information, programme teams undertake the annual Review and Enhancement Process which is co-ordinated at School level and includes student participation. The process is monitored by the Quality and Standards Committee.

Once every six years an in-depth review of the whole field is undertaken by a panel that includes at least two external subject specialists.  The panel considers documents, looks at student work, speaks to current and former students and speaks to staff before drawing its conclusions.  The result is a report highlighting good practice and identifying areas where action is needed.

The role of the programme committee

This programme has a programme committee comprising all relevant teaching staff, student representatives and others who make a contribution towards the effective operation of the programme (e.g. library/technician staff).  The committee has responsibilities for the quality of the programme. It provides input into the operation of the Review and Enhancement Process and proposes changes to improve quality.  The programme committee plays a critical role in the quality assurance procedures.

The role of external examiners

The standard of this programme is monitored by at least one external examiner.  External examiners have two primary responsibilities:

  • To ensure the standard of the programme;
  • To ensure that justice is done to individual students.

External examiners fulfil these responsibilities in a variety of ways including:

  • Approving exam papers/assignments;
  • Attending assessment boards;
  • Reviewing samples of student work and moderating marks;
  • Ensuring that regulations are followed;
  • Providing feedback through an annual report that enables us to make improvements for the future.

Listening to the views of students

The following methods for gaining student feedback are used on this programme:

In order to monitor and implement change on the programme, various feedback mechanisms have been implemented with staff, trainees and the University administration all involved in the changes.

In sum, any changes in the programme have been due to:

  • Changes in the BPS and HCPC requirements
  • Trainee feedback
  • Staff feedback
  • Developments in the world of Counselling Psychology
  • Changes in the NHS
  • University requirements

To assess the programme we use;

  • Module evaluations
  • Student representation on programme committees
  • Regular weekly staff : trainee meetings

Students are notified of the action taken through:

  • circulating the minutes of the programme committee
  • a regular programme meeting

Listening to the views of others

The following methods are used for gaining the views of other interested parties:

  • Feedback from placements/ongoing liaison with placement supervisors
  • Attending meetings/conferences with colleagues

To assess the programme we use;

  • Module evaluations
  • Student representation on programme committees
  • Regular weekly staff : trainee meetings

Students are notified of the action taken through:

  • circulating the minutes of the programme committee
  • a weekly programme meeting

Further Information

Where you can find further information

For further information about the programme please contact psychology@uel.ac.uk

Further information about this programme is available from:

Web icon Fees

Web icon Facebook

Share